Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Posts Tagged ‘statistics’

Instrument Fiero

Posted by cadsmith on March 7, 2011

speedtest

A/B testing supported by Optimizely and SumoOptimize. Firefox 4 Beta announced. RStudio is an IDE for R.

Intendix produces brain computer speller. Mogwee app is for mobile social group chat. Battery made from aerogel. Geotrio posts video tours. Senate maps wireless spectrum.

Security avatar questions travellers. Geminoid is a realistic android. Robotics react to human emotions and play basketball. There were twenty recent links.

Book Reviews:

Reality is Broken: why games make us better and how they can change the world, McGonigal, 2011. Video

The author looks at trends in collaboration and augmented reality. Games provide a satisfying and social way to accomplish tasks and improve skills using positive emotional activation. They show how to tackle unnecessary obstacles. One of the goals is to develop massively multiplayer foresight. This is expected to be a 68 billion dollar industry in 2012. Ten instances of global epic scale efforts are detailed for health, climate, peace, and economics. There are three parts for fourteen chapters. Book site.

The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom, Morozov, 2011. Video

The internet, and social media such as Facebook and Twitter, are used to promote democracy and activism, but are also a means of surveillance, censorship and propaganda by authoritarian governments. Cases are shown in China, Iran, and Russia. There are eleven chapters.

Climatopolis, Kahn, 2010

Sixty percent of the population will be urban by 2030. Carbon dioxide will cause air temperatures to rise. The author is an economist and optimistically expects a successful capitalist response from many innovations. There are several lessons. Each city will respond differently. There will be migration, rebuilding and booms in the aftermaths. Government activism increases risk-taking, taxes go up and corruption degrades quality. Climate models vary on predictions of rates and amounts of sea level rise which will impact coastlines. The scenarios for NYC, LA and China are looked at in depth. There are nine chapters. Also see synopses here and here.

Thinking Machines and the Philosophy of computer Science: Concepts and Principles, Vallverdú, 2010

The papers show summaries of multiple opinions on research topics such as information, biological computing, quantum mechanics, robotics, and security.

There are five sections for twenty-two chapters by thirty-two contributors in addition to the editor. Also on Safari.

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Pathos Least

Posted by cadsmith on October 31, 2010

Shield-Nano-Blue-Brown-RGB-102px

The internet adds Everest and loses Tehran as US boosts broadband. WiFi direct protocol groups devices. Cell doubles as remote. Semantic web publishes R2RML and MathML 3. China boasts supercomputer lead. Computers used for emotion meter. Intel has press site. HealthTap individualizes care. Knight funds media contest. Security weaves code and judges cyberwar while Iranian hackers trade botnets. No math word problems, but some tips on stories versus statistics. Google does spreadsheet visualization and random street view. AutoBot links car to web. Traffic lights save gas. Digital museums open to public and print 3D. Nook adds color reader. NASA introduces A-Train and tests flight deck. Robots plug into brain and use beanbag hands.

Book reviews:

User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn, 2004

This approach is from Agile User-Centered Design. Stories can also be added to Scrum. Extreme programming, XP, centers on testing, automated and acceptance. The testing is for usability, performance and stress rather than code coverage. There are various techniques used for developing the stories. They are modular for estimation and testability. A case is shown for a workshop having user role cards and story cards. A story card is a reminder of features to discuss. Each bug report is considered its own story. The planning game customer prioritizes their user story cards for the next iteration after developers have indicated the effort estimations for each. Tests are prepared prior to the code. Stories are grouped. A paper prototype is created and refined before programming begins. The UI is postponed for as long as possible. User goals can be listed from which stories will be derived. Burndown charts are used to track iteration hours. Another measure of momentum is the number of story points over time where each is an estimate for an ideal workday. The term smells is used for problems between participants, e.g. customer won’t do the stories, for which solutions are proposed. There are four parts beside an appendix on extreme programming. Each has a chapter summary, responsibilities of the developer and customer, and questions.

Previous links (of about thirty-four):

video

The Poetry of Science: Richard Dawkins and Neil deGrasse Tyson – K21st Essential 21st Century Knowledge
YouTube – R.A. Mashelkar: Breakthrough designs for ultra-low-cost products
The Future of Money on Vimeo
Digg – Deadly Memory Card Testing: Overkill Edition [Video]

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Point to Pole

Posted by cadsmith on October 10, 2010

The Pole

Political artifacts are sweeping much of the attention. Next generation designs consider networks, environment, globalization, and personalization. Architecture seems to be maintaining eyes and ears and administering disapproving dread on behalf of a someone or something in the central keep. Votes are predicted and ballots are built according to the pulse from purchases, product use and promotional responses for goodness’ sake. Some take the quest to the furthest outposts which then become the new melting pots. Others meld to media and march the machines in their stead. Statistics are a snapshot of what needs to be shaped next and there is a cloud of colors around the computation.

Recent links (about twenty-seven):

Book Reviews:

The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization’s Northern Future, Laurence C. Smith, 2010
The author is a professor of earth and atmospheric sciences. There are three parts for ten chapters. Each chapter provides trend data and describes what 2050 will be like. The forces are demographics, resource demand, globalization, climate change. These all include technology. Ground rules included no silver bullets or world war III or hidden genies, and the models are okay. There is a trend toward urbanization. Resource depletion is analyzed. Carbon-free energy sources include hydropower, wind and concentrated solar thermal power. Water is in contention between farmers and cities. Computer models indicate rising air temperatures in the north. Trade can increase around the north pole without need for major contention. There is a third wave of immigration to the northern rim and the arctic seabed. Ancestral traditions merge with modern business practices. Models of abrupt climate change indicate probability that northern fresh water will not be affected and it may redirect water to the south. The new north may be like the American West at the start of the nineteenth century.

video

YouTube – Hans Rosling: The good news of the decade?
YouTube – Digital Art@Google: James Tunick and Jack Toolin
YouTube – Barbara Block: Tagging tuna in the deep ocean
Tim Jackson’s economic reality check | Video on TED.com

application Ovi app wizard beta

censorship The .ly domain space to be considered unsafe | :Ben Metcalfe Blog

computation Technology Review: Blogs: arXiv blog: The Post-Singularity Future Of Astronomy

disaster A flood of toxic sludge – The Big Picture – Boston.com

ebooks Worldreader.org – Books for All

games

World of Warcraft: Cataclysm
IBM INNOV8: CityOne

government Tech CEOs tell US gov’t how to cut $1 trillion from deficit

ideas Kevin Kelly and Steven Johnson on Where Ideas Come From | Magazine

linkedin LinkedIn and PwC Launch Breakthrough Career Mapping Tool for College Students | LinkedIn – Public Relations

medical Berkeley Bionics

review ‘The Social Network’: A Review Of Aaron Sorkin’s Film About Facebook And Mark Zuckerberg | The New Republic

robotics

Boy of 15 fitted with robotic heart – Computer Chips & Hardware Technology | Geek.com
IEEE Spectrum: Humanoid Robots Rise. Now, Can They Walk?
IEEE Spectrum: Omniwheels Gaining Popularity in Robotics

security Collective Defense: Applying Public Health Models to the Internet (PDF)

space

Update: Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo Makes First Glide Flight | Autopia | Wired.com
The Space Game

statistics Truthy

tags FollowYours

tv Quick Tour – Google TV

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Big Project

Posted by cadsmith on September 4, 2010

thunderbird

The border between environment and society is blurring. Natural scarcity may not be reflected in prices because of temporary subsidies, but economics is adjusting to new equations based on population, climate and urbanization. Science is directed to reveal all of the parameters and relationships. Development looks at reuse and hazard reduction. Biotech has a global market base. Computation puts the expanding data into perspective. Technological determinism adds network archaeology. Society learns how to respond constructively to challenging events.

Recent links (about 30):

academic Welcome | MIT150 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology 150th anniversary

biotech The BioBricks Foundation

books

The Marshall Plan for Novel Writing, Evan Marshall, 2001

Writing the Blockbuster Novel, Albert Zuckerman, 1994

Dynamic Characters, Nancy Kress, 1998

climate Climate Change: A Software Grand Challenge | Serendipity

computer Dr Dobbs – IBM Claims World’s Fastest Microprocessor

disaster World Natural Hazards Website | Natural Disaster Management | Disaster Agency Hawaii – PDC

environment

Technology Review: Robotic Storm Tracker Gets a Big Test with Earl

Weather conditions tie fires in Russia to floods in Pakistan | Environment & Development | Deutsche Welle | 01.09.2010

The Deepening Crisis: Scientific American

Hurricane Earl Weakens to Category 3 Storm – WSJ.com

Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster, Keith Smith, 2004

YouTube – Johan Rockstrom: Let the environment guide our development

mathematics Impossible Soccer Kick Leads to New Physics Equation | Playbook

mobile Mobile App Helps Emergency Crews Assess Damage During Disasters

network Technology Review: Blogs: arXiv blog: The New Science of Network Archaeology

publishing

Subutai Corporation

Moving Tales – Bringing Stories to Life on your iPad

robotics

IEEE Spectrum: NASA Ready to Send Humanoid Robot to Space

Technology Review: Blogs: TR Editors’ blog: Robots Take Out the Trash

science ScienceDirect – Home

semantic The Semantic Puzzle | Why SKOS thesauri matter – the next generation of semantic technologies

sports IBM at the US Open – Analyzing Every Volley, Serve and Overhead Smash – ReadWriteCloud

statistics The Big Data Explosion and the Demand for the Statistical Tools to Analyze It – ReadWriteCloud

telepresence IEEE Spectrum: Telepresence: A Manifesto

urban

How Can Los Angeles Adapt to Coming Climate Change?: Scientific American

Augmented Reality Coming to DC Bus Stops Today (Photo)

video New Microscope Enables Real-Time 3-D Movies of Developing Embryos [Slide Show]: Scientific American

Book review:

Biology Is Technology, Robert H. Carlson, 2010

This is a study of the economics of biology. It reviews the trajectory of technology, biotech, genetic engineering and industrial projections. Gene-sequencing already has international sites and a critical mass is evolving for a growth in synthetic parts exchange. Opensource is creating a participative market. Current applications include biobricks, iGEM, biofuels, and instant vaccines among many others. The turning point is that the human has become a product which redefines the producers and consumers themselves and increases the complexity of behaviors. Limits on innovation concerning rights and patents are discussed. There are risks of runaway effects which need to be better understood and monitored where possible. The opening questions about what biology is, and what biological engineering will be, are ongoing. Readers interested in bioinformatics would need additional sources.

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Inference or Deference

Posted by cadsmith on July 26, 2009

Data may be interpreted differently by various experts, e.g. during fault analysis. Some of this is due to limited methods or predisposition. Automation is attempted for machines, but may be inadequate for procedures or other people. Preferring emotion over culture may beg the question if intuition is constrained by social learnings and nature. Deliberate falsification requires detection. Data which is camouflaged may need decoding. Hidden expectations can often be revealed and corrected using statistical probability techniques such as Bayesian analysis.

Mathematical case: incisive or decisive

Medical case: inductive or deductive

Reading list included Posner 2008 on decision-making theory, Swenson 2008 on decryption, Robinson 2007 on verification and Mitnick 2003 on investigation.

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