Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Posts Tagged ‘search’

Mesh Plexus

Posted by cadsmith on February 20, 2011

Embedded quality concerns highlighted by Accenture. Test lab management organized by Parasoft Virtualize. Mutual Mobile tests enterprise apps. SOASTA performs cloud and mobile load tests. Strike has simple task manager. Google bookmarks imports directly from delicious.

Wolfram reviews Watson. Satellites learn to dodge obstacles. Roombots morph into furniture. Meka Robotics combines Kinect and ROS. Lasers transfer data on-chip. Antilaser absorbs light.

BrainDriver kit for mind over motorcar. Compare to driving while blind. Ants lead in network trails.

inboxQ sweeps Twitter Q&A. RIM acquires Gist contact manager. Greplin searches social media. Crowdsourcing may speed social development. Wikistrat observes how tech propels global middle. EFF reports expansion in federal surveillance. Hackers spoof news via Wi-Fi.

Doctor’s brief presents Tech and Medicine. Nurses are apprehensive of alarm fatigue. Human skin becomes printable. Nanobioconnect hosts directory.

Mississippi powers underwater turbines. Geothermal Energy plentiful in Iceland. There were thirty-one recent links.

Book Review:

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos, Brian Greene, 2011

Nine types of parallel universes are proposed including quilted, inflationary, brane, cyclic, landscape, quantum, holographic, simulated and ultimate. The questions include how to test these theories, e.g. involving features which are common, or correlated, to the known universe, possibly through computation, and whether they can be used to solve problems. Various components such as black holes, string theory, and branes are explored and related to each model. There are eleven chapters. Audio comments

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Datapole

Posted by cadsmith on January 23, 2011

Mobile is hot as Google’s priority this year, app market of 25B in several years, Bubbly has voice tweets, and PLX XWave is a brain monitor. Tablets replace Wintel. Travel includes an all-automated hotel. Vending machines recognize faces. Philosophy promotes testing. Accessibility can be validated using A-Prompt and Cynthia Says. TestFlight can be used for  IOS betas. Security has warnings about attack toolkits, non-Windows systems, printers, resumes, and smartphone seizure, though it may have over-hyped cyberwar. Remote guide dogs announced. Robotics features a comedian and window cleaner. DIY gets alerts from physical mailbox. Internet TV offered by Roku. 3D digitization is exploited for medical visualization. FEMA is looking to adapt to social media. Touch Press displays data dynamically in books. Qwiki searches for information experiences. Firefox 4 released in beta. There were 37 recent links.

Book Review:

Design Driven Testing: Test Smarter, Not Harder, Stephens and Rosenberg, 2010

DDT goals are to fulfill requirements, validate design and verify code. The tests are derived and refactored from the code. This is contrasted to test driven-design. The authors have implemented a process using UML dubbed ICONIX. A conceptual design is positioned midway between the use cases and detailed design. Ten-step lists are each outlined for TDD, DDT, unit, controller, scenarios, requirements, antipatterns, design, integration and algorithm testing. Sequence diagrams are shown throughout. Mock objects and services are used, and unit tests included in builds. There is some discussion of automation, but metrics are not detailed. The style of the book uses allegorical narratives based on satires of alice in wonderland and the temple of doom. This includes some poetry. There are twelve chapters and an appendix from original presentation on subject of use cases. Tips interspersed in the text, as well as inline notes or footnotes that link to other sources. Code samples demonstrate the techniques for a mobile Palm Pilot mapplet to do travel GIS hotel search for a web site.

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Net for Sale

Posted by cadsmith on January 9, 2011

US citizens to get Internet ID. LG ties smart grid to smartphones and tablets. Trimensional has 3D scanner for iphone. Factual has web and mobile APIs. Forrester says third of users will have tablets by 2015. Vuzix makes video eyeware. Videoscape promoted by Cisco service providers. Viewdle tags photos. Google Hotpot ranks realworld locations. Hipmunk does flight search. Clever Sense has location-aware concierge AI. Dedicated AIs are more successful. Hybrid Assistive Limb is a robotic exoskeleton. Industrial robot name Little Helper. OpenStack provides open-source for clouds. OpenStudy supports social study groups. DIASPORA open-source socnet in alpha. Minimal blogging editor outputs RSS. Feed.nu converts a blog to an android app. DKIM vouches for email. Social Security expects next computer to be years behind demand. Kneber botnet hits government. MAINGATE is new mobile defense network. Amazon Web Services used for wifi hacking research. Estonia starts cyber army. Wikistrat produces geopol journals. Eagleman looks at brains and behaviors. Convergence creates revolution in biomedicine. DNA test determines physical characteristics such as hair color. There is a digital Radiation Detector. Oil Prices begin to dig deeper. High tech Horse Show announced. Gilt Groupe carries luxury brands. Thirty-five recent links.

Book Reviews:

The Master Switch, Tim Wu, 2010

A separation principle of content from transport would maintain an open internet. The author discusses the history of telecommunications and describes an open-to-closed cycle. Convergence in this context means monopoly. This results from a paradox of how US consumers chose convenience over freedom. Other factors are network effects, power of integration, economies of scale, and will to power. There are five parts for twenty-one chapters.

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Pace Time

Posted by cadsmith on December 19, 2010

future of cities

Arbor graphs DDOS stats. The US is establishing an Internet Privacy Office. Supercomputer benchmark measures graph handling. CrisisCommons handles disaster data. List of computer mishaps. A simple site registration utility is provided by Facebook. S4 Momentum tracks social media. Social branding is marketed by Wildfire. Recommendations for Personal Media streaming. Spabba does bookmarking since delicious may be divested. SEO tips for ebooks. 750 Words has online writing editor. Video of Health 2.0 keynote by Tim O’Reilly. Contest offers health prize for in-patient predictions. Body Browser searches anatomy. Muro does browser-based art. Game development is free using UDK. Film-like mocap improves games. Cyborg beetles can fly. PR2 robots sold. Humanoid bot announced in France. Automated round vac prototyped. Startup tech trends listed in addition to Crowdfunding and Chile. Molten Salt stores energy. MapQuest has site in US. Thirty-one recent links added.

Books Reviews:

Intelligent User Interfaces: Adaptation and Personalization Systems and Technologies, Panagiotis and Germanakos, 2008

This book is about how to improve findability. Major sections include theory, content, process, applications and security. Personalization refers to an individual’s or group’s unique needs and preferences. Adaptive features fit to these, context, and structure. Some of the common topics are user profiles, recommendation, models, hypermedia and e-government. Seventeen studies by thirty-eight contributors discuss categories such as privacy-enhanced personalization, emotional intelligence, e-learning assistants, open learner modeling, digital memories, cognitive style, adaptive parallel media stream servers, web usage mining, visualization methods, ontology-based, semantically adaptive, intelligent information, middleware architecture, web-based instruction, access/navigation/search, and adaptive hypermedia.

Surviving Cyberwar, Stiennon 2010
This book details methods of cyber intelligence. Cyberwar is dated from 2008 since, though there were network attacks a decade before, they were not coordinated military offensives. The author proposes four essential pillars which drive the war: technology, logistics, command and intelligence. Cases of social media being used for this as geopolitical tools are shown. Trojans are effective. Denial of service, the classic internet asault, is currently defended in ad hoc fashion. The simple assumption by network and endpoint security are that eachother are hostile, similarly by data for the user. It looks at the level of preparedness of major states and explains the US CNCI. Counterespionage has entered a new age. Future government depends upon how network security and privacy develop. There are fifteen chapters. It was published before the wikileaks controversy.

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Being Wells

Posted by cadsmith on November 28, 2010

dvinfographic-thumb-610x627-25020

The internet-of-things will use a mobile embedded SIM chip. Notebook apps include Simplenote, Org-Mode and alternatives. Aviary added an HTML5 Photo Editor. Formstack eases editing. Mastermind allows hands-free game play. Search considers serendipity. Feds aim for cloud option. Trusted Secure Computing is presented in Europe. API usage is clarified. Kaggle aggregates datamining competitors. Data Compression is based on a card trick.

The health industry expects more networks, bots, ad artifacts. Biotech reviews ramifications of ID implants. A mobile camera drone has bird’s eye view. Bots rescue the battle-ridden. Communities reevaluate economics. Futurist Bill Gates discusses progress. Nanoparticles have environmental impact. Journalism uses more social media.  Philosophy uses field experiments. AI attends to when computers will take over and Numenta hierarchical temporal memory. Human Enhancement: Bioliberation shown on video.

There were about twenty-eight recent links.

Book Reviews:

Data Analysis with Open Source Tools, Philipp K. Janert, 2010
This book discusses how to make models and mine data. The author provides caveats that that appearances often override data, decision makers use data for support rather than reasoning, ethics outweigh data, and many things cannot be measured yet. Realtime means right this minute rather than up to date. Data is cleaned prior to analysis. There are a couple of dozen software tools discussed. It uses math examples rather than code, for data analysis and calculus, and has a statistics refresher. There are interesting styles of plots. Some case studies are detailed. Each chapter has workshop exercises, an intermezzo for related topics, and further reading. There are four parts, eighteen chapters and three appendices. The reader interested in data filtering might need additional sources beyond the time series presented here.

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values, Sam Harris, 2010
This book proposes that science can address moral absolutes. If right and good relate to human and animal wll-being, then there are answers. The title is an analogy to a texture that has peaks for well-being and depths for suffering. Mental experience and values can be measured. Facts of the world can be assembled into knowledge. There can then be rational argument that results in the highest amount of well-being. This is an interesting discussion also presented in video lectures. There are five chapters which also include belief, religion and the future of happiness. There is heavy emphasis on topics related to brain science and structures and neuroimaging. The author likens the method to medicine or economics yet, while these are considered sciences, they are subject to significant errors, so there is also a need to understand how to improve the practice of the principles. The reader may also wonder if the brain will be the best processor for these types of decisions. The Monty Hall problem is discussed as a demonstration of the wisdom of switching, but this seems to be neutralized if contestants are split half on one side and half on the other so both would be better off switching.

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Endgame

Posted by cadsmith on November 21, 2010

Approaching the conclusion of the year, predictions for the next begin with announcements for the cloud and security. An easier messaging system is introduced for Facebook and AI may eventually use data. Gravity graphs interests. Ipad may have a new digital newspaper. A personal network supports photography. Indeed searches business classifies. States publish statistics. Developers can use head or gestural interfaces. Augmented reality is used to compose music. Robots learn by doing. Radio uses saltwater antenna. Stuxnet may have been built to change nuclear processing. Drones can survey Mars. Fins offered as prosthetics. A teacher plans to put a camera inside back of head. Climate is answerable to science. Carbon nanotubes are inflammable. Maxwell’s demon has been demonstrated. There are contests for movies, and med and bio images.

Recent links (from about twenty-eight):

This Video Will Blow Your Mind (Probably) | The Creators Project
YouTube – Authors@Google: Kevin Kelly
YouTube – Digital Art@Google: DJ Spooky

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To Be Is To Question

Posted by cadsmith on November 7, 2010

IBM personalizes internet. Australia has a digital city. Adobe adds cloud filesharing. Verify gets user feedback on screens. Impure visualizes data. A biological brain navigates a vehicle. In electric cars, a Chevy gets an IP address, and an Urbee is made on printer. Also in 3D, Janus does interactive scanning and holograms do displays. Invisible material disappears. Chip PC is in the plug. Blekko searches selected sites. Gdb does profiling. Sensors warn of landslides. Technoscience combines science and engineering.

Book reviews:

What Technology Wants, Kevin Kelly, 2010
The author seeks the essence of technology as a force the equal of nature. Technology has features such as evolution, complexity, specificity, diversity, and energy dependencies. He introduces the term technium as a form of civilization, an emergent system of accelerated life. Many advancements happen simultaneously in multiple places, e.g. the Axial Age. This is the result of new technologies increasing the odds of successors. There are four parts for fourteen chapters. It is written in an optimistic, mind-expanding style. He covers the ideas of many other authors such as Joel Garreau and W. Brian Arthur. There are twenty-books in the reading list including authors such as Ray Kurzweil and Steward Brand. Though not cited here, there have been efforts to formalize technology’s philosophical roots, theory, and predictions, reviewed earlier on this blog and google books.

Recent links (of about twenty-four):

video

YouTube – Tom Chatfield: 7 ways video games engage the brain
YouTube – Authors@Google: Alice Walker

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Area Than Light

Posted by cadsmith on August 23, 2010

NasaSolarSail

The real world gets a game layer, iris scanning, risks, relief, aquabatics and solar sails.  See new AI, telepresence and climate control videos. Smartphones support sign language, and publishing does augmented reality. Economists seek new values amid a network of cities. Machine learning gets a prediction API. Semantic web and simulation get faster. Cyberpunk titles get reviewed.

Original scifi Streetseekers and mystery Casadrome added to previous Last of the Humans. Also from Amazon.

Recent links (about 23):

ai

YouTube – Eliezer Yudkowsky – The Challenge of Friendly AI (1/3)

YouTube – Peter Molyneux demos Milo, the virtual boy

augmented-reality Can Augmented Reality Help Save the Print Publishing Industry?

books Global Catastrophic Risks, edited by Nick Bostrom and Milan M. Cirkovic, 2008

crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing Disaster Relief

economics America’s Lost Decade(s) – Umair Haque – Harvard Business Review

games YouTube – Seth Priebatsch: Building the game layer on top of the world

internet Technology Review: Blogs: Mims’s Bits: The Fear-Based Psychology of the “Internet Kill Switch”

machinelearning Google Prediction API – Google Code

mobile Better Than FaceTime? Researchers Test New Mobile Technology for Deaf

nanotech YouTube – The Weather Machine: Nano-Enabled Climate Control for the Earth – 1

ocean Innespace

optical Technology Review: Blogs: Mims’s Bits: Using Einstein’s Relativity to Speed up Supercomputer Simulations 10,000%

satellite NASA – Sailing Among the Stars

scifi

Infoquake, David Lewis Edelman, 2006

Halting State, by Charles Stross, 2007

The Mirrored Heavens, David J. Williams, 2008

search The Future of Internet Search – Project Syndicate

security Iris Scanners Create the Most Secure City in the World. Welcome, Big Brother | Fast Company

semantic-web Dr Dobbs – Semantic Web Bottleneck

social-networks Flowr. Real-time Collaboration, knowledge exchange and smart information flow.

telepresence YouTube – John Delaney: Wiring an interactive ocean

urban Beyond City Limits – By Parag Khanna | Foreign Policy

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Inductions Enter

Posted by cadsmith on July 12, 2009

Recent lightning strikes highlighted shuttle test procedures, e.g. video and tweets.

While characterizing test info space, drafted How to Write a Case Study on Scribd as an initial perspective for that newly added site. There is also potential material about topics, FAQ, distributed data types, utilities, history, trends, future, sites and services. Linked some of the test titles to wiki Documents. Titles also report data and are a form of it. Additional works can be found by tag search, or lookup related items. The goal of finding all relevant data may require additional approaches. Sorting is also useful. Titles show statistics such as number of views, or other pages which embed or link it. When looking at a particular title, can view in various modes, preview tile all pages, double-page spread, slides, or scroll. Can combine to skim contents for outlining. May also peruse by people or groups. Reading larger works might be improved by hyper-linking the index, if included, and making it easier to go to specific pages rather than having to use the tile view. Hardware test, debug, validation and design verification could use more titles.

Anderson 2009 looks at internet commerce. Applications for a TIS might include: give away summary of issues, charge for instance of solutions; give away TIS approach, charge for implementations or integrations; give away data, charge for api/apps/hw, or vice-versa; give away test results, charge for comparative analysis; and give away methods or website, charge for effort, e.g. test, debug, develop.

Johnson 2007 discusses usability.

Image: Lightning

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Astrocite

Posted by cadsmith on June 7, 2009

Time-keeping rapidly reaches its limits when applied to social networks so there may be a need for more innovative utilities to allow organization of distributed elements in real-time.

Am importing Test Info Space bibliography into Google books to allow user content search, e.g. “unit test“. This is a form of local search which has previously been done on data and documents across synched mobile devices and servers prioritizing relevance with respect to the web. Wider topics can still be reviewed using multimedia search engines such as new Bing. Dedicated video search engines require transcripts or audio phonetic search, and metadata.

Incremental reading this week was Fry 2009 on security and Mirlas 2009 on web commerce. Videos included Sullivan 2009 on CSS, Smith 2008 on Ajax, Reyelts 2007 on unit test, Norton 2007 on usability, and Monroy 2008 on graphics.

Image: Sundial.

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