Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Posts Tagged ‘health’

Mesh Plexus

Posted by cadsmith on February 20, 2011

Embedded quality concerns highlighted by Accenture. Test lab management organized by Parasoft Virtualize. Mutual Mobile tests enterprise apps. SOASTA performs cloud and mobile load tests. Strike has simple task manager. Google bookmarks imports directly from delicious.

Wolfram reviews Watson. Satellites learn to dodge obstacles. Roombots morph into furniture. Meka Robotics combines Kinect and ROS. Lasers transfer data on-chip. Antilaser absorbs light.

BrainDriver kit for mind over motorcar. Compare to driving while blind. Ants lead in network trails.

inboxQ sweeps Twitter Q&A. RIM acquires Gist contact manager. Greplin searches social media. Crowdsourcing may speed social development. Wikistrat observes how tech propels global middle. EFF reports expansion in federal surveillance. Hackers spoof news via Wi-Fi.

Doctor’s brief presents Tech and Medicine. Nurses are apprehensive of alarm fatigue. Human skin becomes printable. Nanobioconnect hosts directory.

Mississippi powers underwater turbines. Geothermal Energy plentiful in Iceland. There were thirty-one recent links.

Book Review:

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos, Brian Greene, 2011

Nine types of parallel universes are proposed including quilted, inflationary, brane, cyclic, landscape, quantum, holographic, simulated and ultimate. The questions include how to test these theories, e.g. involving features which are common, or correlated, to the known universe, possibly through computation, and whether they can be used to solve problems. Various components such as black holes, string theory, and branes are explored and related to each model. There are eleven chapters. Audio comments

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In Media Res

Posted by cadsmith on February 14, 2011

Pen.io publishes pages. SpeakerText does transcription. TigerText does secure texting. Mobile Basecamp released. Automated reading clarifies historic maps. Cloud contest announced. HP challenges Google for cloud. Paygr does service classifieds. DIY blogs Ramshackle Solid and Homegrown Evolution feature case studies.

Universal flu vaccine handles all strains. DNA adhesives used to label valuables.

Anonymous claims Stuxnet source. Night Dragon virus penetrates energy firm systems. Medical Device Innovation Initiative fast tracks regulatory approvals. Unmanned combat air system US Navy X-47B tested.

Motorika provides robotic rehab. Affetto does realistic faces. Bilibot Project makes robotics cheaper. eRockit and YikeBike offer electric bikes.

Nanowires do computing. On-chip photonics speed up processing. There were twenty-five recent links.

Book review:

Verification and Validation in Scientific Computing, Oberkampf and Roy, 2010

Scientific computing is finding more uses in engineering and research. This book is about model verification. The questions are how well a simulation matches an actual activity, or how to get experimental data for a mathematics of micro- and nano-scales, and whether reviewers will find the results credible. Verification activities are shown for software, solution, model and management. Predictive capability is summarized in several steps for identifying sources of uncertainty, characterizing them, estimating error and uncertainty in the system response quantities (SRQs), updating the model, and analyzing sensitivities. There are five parts for sixteen chapters, and an appendix.

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Being Wells

Posted by cadsmith on November 28, 2010

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The internet-of-things will use a mobile embedded SIM chip. Notebook apps include Simplenote, Org-Mode and alternatives. Aviary added an HTML5 Photo Editor. Formstack eases editing. Mastermind allows hands-free game play. Search considers serendipity. Feds aim for cloud option. Trusted Secure Computing is presented in Europe. API usage is clarified. Kaggle aggregates datamining competitors. Data Compression is based on a card trick.

The health industry expects more networks, bots, ad artifacts. Biotech reviews ramifications of ID implants. A mobile camera drone has bird’s eye view. Bots rescue the battle-ridden. Communities reevaluate economics. Futurist Bill Gates discusses progress. Nanoparticles have environmental impact. Journalism uses more social media.  Philosophy uses field experiments. AI attends to when computers will take over and Numenta hierarchical temporal memory. Human Enhancement: Bioliberation shown on video.

There were about twenty-eight recent links.

Book Reviews:

Data Analysis with Open Source Tools, Philipp K. Janert, 2010
This book discusses how to make models and mine data. The author provides caveats that that appearances often override data, decision makers use data for support rather than reasoning, ethics outweigh data, and many things cannot be measured yet. Realtime means right this minute rather than up to date. Data is cleaned prior to analysis. There are a couple of dozen software tools discussed. It uses math examples rather than code, for data analysis and calculus, and has a statistics refresher. There are interesting styles of plots. Some case studies are detailed. Each chapter has workshop exercises, an intermezzo for related topics, and further reading. There are four parts, eighteen chapters and three appendices. The reader interested in data filtering might need additional sources beyond the time series presented here.

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values, Sam Harris, 2010
This book proposes that science can address moral absolutes. If right and good relate to human and animal wll-being, then there are answers. The title is an analogy to a texture that has peaks for well-being and depths for suffering. Mental experience and values can be measured. Facts of the world can be assembled into knowledge. There can then be rational argument that results in the highest amount of well-being. This is an interesting discussion also presented in video lectures. There are five chapters which also include belief, religion and the future of happiness. There is heavy emphasis on topics related to brain science and structures and neuroimaging. The author likens the method to medicine or economics yet, while these are considered sciences, they are subject to significant errors, so there is also a need to understand how to improve the practice of the principles. The reader may also wonder if the brain will be the best processor for these types of decisions. The Monty Hall problem is discussed as a demonstration of the wisdom of switching, but this seems to be neutralized if contestants are split half on one side and half on the other so both would be better off switching.

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Pathos Least

Posted by cadsmith on October 31, 2010

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The internet adds Everest and loses Tehran as US boosts broadband. WiFi direct protocol groups devices. Cell doubles as remote. Semantic web publishes R2RML and MathML 3. China boasts supercomputer lead. Computers used for emotion meter. Intel has press site. HealthTap individualizes care. Knight funds media contest. Security weaves code and judges cyberwar while Iranian hackers trade botnets. No math word problems, but some tips on stories versus statistics. Google does spreadsheet visualization and random street view. AutoBot links car to web. Traffic lights save gas. Digital museums open to public and print 3D. Nook adds color reader. NASA introduces A-Train and tests flight deck. Robots plug into brain and use beanbag hands.

Book reviews:

User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn, 2004

This approach is from Agile User-Centered Design. Stories can also be added to Scrum. Extreme programming, XP, centers on testing, automated and acceptance. The testing is for usability, performance and stress rather than code coverage. There are various techniques used for developing the stories. They are modular for estimation and testability. A case is shown for a workshop having user role cards and story cards. A story card is a reminder of features to discuss. Each bug report is considered its own story. The planning game customer prioritizes their user story cards for the next iteration after developers have indicated the effort estimations for each. Tests are prepared prior to the code. Stories are grouped. A paper prototype is created and refined before programming begins. The UI is postponed for as long as possible. User goals can be listed from which stories will be derived. Burndown charts are used to track iteration hours. Another measure of momentum is the number of story points over time where each is an estimate for an ideal workday. The term smells is used for problems between participants, e.g. customer won’t do the stories, for which solutions are proposed. There are four parts beside an appendix on extreme programming. Each has a chapter summary, responsibilities of the developer and customer, and questions.

Previous links (of about thirty-four):

video

The Poetry of Science: Richard Dawkins and Neil deGrasse Tyson – K21st Essential 21st Century Knowledge
YouTube – R.A. Mashelkar: Breakthrough designs for ultra-low-cost products
The Future of Money on Vimeo
Digg – Deadly Memory Card Testing: Overkill Edition [Video]

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Webia Potencia

Posted by cadsmith on April 26, 2009

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The digital consciousness is responding to a recent flu outbreak for which a vaccine is not yet available. This is putting global data handling and analysis systems to the test. An accurate dashboard was not yet obvious. Expect EMR improvements (in records and responder). Also see links from pandemic.

Evernote public folder allows a type of blog entry, though did not yet insert graphics, or have direct post from Windows Live Writer and Zemanta. Topic included Noë which may be relevant to testing worldware. User profile was not shown so appended contact to title. Site updates sent to friendfeed and facebook. Link added to blogs on wordpress and blogger.

This week’s reading list included Sankar 2009 on Enterprise Web 2.0, Melik 2007 about flatworld project management, Polikoff 2005 discussing capability cases, Hamilton 2004 NUnit.

Image: from HealthMap

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