Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Posts Tagged ‘games’

Instrument Fiero

Posted by cadsmith on March 7, 2011

speedtest

A/B testing supported by Optimizely and SumoOptimize. Firefox 4 Beta announced. RStudio is an IDE for R.

Intendix produces brain computer speller. Mogwee app is for mobile social group chat. Battery made from aerogel. Geotrio posts video tours. Senate maps wireless spectrum.

Security avatar questions travellers. Geminoid is a realistic android. Robotics react to human emotions and play basketball. There were twenty recent links.

Book Reviews:

Reality is Broken: why games make us better and how they can change the world, McGonigal, 2011. Video

The author looks at trends in collaboration and augmented reality. Games provide a satisfying and social way to accomplish tasks and improve skills using positive emotional activation. They show how to tackle unnecessary obstacles. One of the goals is to develop massively multiplayer foresight. This is expected to be a 68 billion dollar industry in 2012. Ten instances of global epic scale efforts are detailed for health, climate, peace, and economics. There are three parts for fourteen chapters. Book site.

The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom, Morozov, 2011. Video

The internet, and social media such as Facebook and Twitter, are used to promote democracy and activism, but are also a means of surveillance, censorship and propaganda by authoritarian governments. Cases are shown in China, Iran, and Russia. There are eleven chapters.

Climatopolis, Kahn, 2010

Sixty percent of the population will be urban by 2030. Carbon dioxide will cause air temperatures to rise. The author is an economist and optimistically expects a successful capitalist response from many innovations. There are several lessons. Each city will respond differently. There will be migration, rebuilding and booms in the aftermaths. Government activism increases risk-taking, taxes go up and corruption degrades quality. Climate models vary on predictions of rates and amounts of sea level rise which will impact coastlines. The scenarios for NYC, LA and China are looked at in depth. There are nine chapters. Also see synopses here and here.

Thinking Machines and the Philosophy of computer Science: Concepts and Principles, Vallverdú, 2010

The papers show summaries of multiple opinions on research topics such as information, biological computing, quantum mechanics, robotics, and security.

There are five sections for twenty-two chapters by thirty-two contributors in addition to the editor. Also on Safari.

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New Year’s Greetings

Posted by cadsmith on December 26, 2010

Mechanical Turk provides pool of internet beta testers. Mass High Tech has feed on startups. Google converts wave to shared spaces. Electronic authentication built into banknotes. Smart grid gets smarter. Hydrogen and oxygen produced using solar energy. Bruce Sterling discusses Wikileaks. Surveillance on police. New Year’s security trends. Software requests made by sysadmins. EditPad has online text editor. Delicious does semantic analysis. Groupon trains journalists. Local gifts shown on eBay. Wall St. computers trade on news. Numenta AI apps discussed. Pen provides biofeedback. Developer makes prosthetic tentacle. Gostai Jazz telebot. Eclipse Phase has posthuman game. New ScienceFiction.com site. New Zealand put UFO data online. The Last of the Humans 2010 second edition technothriller about the rise and fall of machine-controlled civilization on Earth was revised and expanded to eight chapters on Amazon and Scribd. Twenty-three links added. (Photo: Boeing X-45 )

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Pace Time

Posted by cadsmith on December 19, 2010

future of cities

Arbor graphs DDOS stats. The US is establishing an Internet Privacy Office. Supercomputer benchmark measures graph handling. CrisisCommons handles disaster data. List of computer mishaps. A simple site registration utility is provided by Facebook. S4 Momentum tracks social media. Social branding is marketed by Wildfire. Recommendations for Personal Media streaming. Spabba does bookmarking since delicious may be divested. SEO tips for ebooks. 750 Words has online writing editor. Video of Health 2.0 keynote by Tim O’Reilly. Contest offers health prize for in-patient predictions. Body Browser searches anatomy. Muro does browser-based art. Game development is free using UDK. Film-like mocap improves games. Cyborg beetles can fly. PR2 robots sold. Humanoid bot announced in France. Automated round vac prototyped. Startup tech trends listed in addition to Crowdfunding and Chile. Molten Salt stores energy. MapQuest has site in US. Thirty-one recent links added.

Books Reviews:

Intelligent User Interfaces: Adaptation and Personalization Systems and Technologies, Panagiotis and Germanakos, 2008

This book is about how to improve findability. Major sections include theory, content, process, applications and security. Personalization refers to an individual’s or group’s unique needs and preferences. Adaptive features fit to these, context, and structure. Some of the common topics are user profiles, recommendation, models, hypermedia and e-government. Seventeen studies by thirty-eight contributors discuss categories such as privacy-enhanced personalization, emotional intelligence, e-learning assistants, open learner modeling, digital memories, cognitive style, adaptive parallel media stream servers, web usage mining, visualization methods, ontology-based, semantically adaptive, intelligent information, middleware architecture, web-based instruction, access/navigation/search, and adaptive hypermedia.

Surviving Cyberwar, Stiennon 2010
This book details methods of cyber intelligence. Cyberwar is dated from 2008 since, though there were network attacks a decade before, they were not coordinated military offensives. The author proposes four essential pillars which drive the war: technology, logistics, command and intelligence. Cases of social media being used for this as geopolitical tools are shown. Trojans are effective. Denial of service, the classic internet asault, is currently defended in ad hoc fashion. The simple assumption by network and endpoint security are that eachother are hostile, similarly by data for the user. It looks at the level of preparedness of major states and explains the US CNCI. Counterespionage has entered a new age. Future government depends upon how network security and privacy develop. There are fifteen chapters. It was published before the wikileaks controversy.

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Counter Logic

Posted by cadsmith on December 4, 2010

The internet has public resources for improving community wealth. Tools for datamining and code metrics include cmetrics, FLOSSmole, FLOSSMetrics. and SLOCCount.Award for software testing and debugging: 1, 2, and 3. Utilities assist scenario forecasting. Kurzweil’s futurist performance was graded. AI is used for sports betting. Security adds computational forensics. SocialSci is a science research network. Engineering addresses world problems. Trees have been added to google earth engine. Digital evolution arrives at fireflies. News stream made from bitly links. CreateSpace self-publishes media. Irish expats have a social network. Comicspipeline.com shows arts in progress. Veterinarian designs prostheses. Phylo is a genomic game. Video discusses bioliberation. There were twenty-eight recent links.

Book Reviews:

Model-Driven Software Development: Integrating Quality Assurance, Rech and Bunse, 2008

An effect of a good model is to define the terminology and to automate analysis. The control and data flow are often similar to classical code-driven processes, but may be easier to handle since formats are less difference. The book has four sections for eighteen chapters from fifty authors. They discuss quality evaluation and improvement for specific domains. UML was an early instance; peer review was a quality method. New developments are shown for embedded systems, automotive, service engineering and infrared telescope. Some of these have used Matlab/Simulink/TargetLink. Metrics include matrices for maintainability, reusability, portability, efficiency and performance, for example. The book describes case studies. Models are inspected for completeness, consistency, traceability, and correctness. Empirical testing is still used to characterize system implementations.

Making Software, Oram and Wilson, 2010
This is a set of scholarly research papers which is interesting for, not only the results, but also the methods and the places under study. There are two parts on general principles and specific topics by forty-five authors. The table of contents shows the titles and subjects for thirty chapters, each of which also has a list of references. Part of the book’s implicit knowledge comes from how the authors answered their questions as well as how they present the evidence. The question becomes how to measure and improve these skills in other organizations and on a more continuous basis. The most common areas of interest are productivity metrics and measurement. These are shown for different software development process models and code bases. They also look at the limitations of education. There are some new concepts such as socio-technical congruence as a measure of coordination.

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Being Wells

Posted by cadsmith on November 28, 2010

dvinfographic-thumb-610x627-25020

The internet-of-things will use a mobile embedded SIM chip. Notebook apps include Simplenote, Org-Mode and alternatives. Aviary added an HTML5 Photo Editor. Formstack eases editing. Mastermind allows hands-free game play. Search considers serendipity. Feds aim for cloud option. Trusted Secure Computing is presented in Europe. API usage is clarified. Kaggle aggregates datamining competitors. Data Compression is based on a card trick.

The health industry expects more networks, bots, ad artifacts. Biotech reviews ramifications of ID implants. A mobile camera drone has bird’s eye view. Bots rescue the battle-ridden. Communities reevaluate economics. Futurist Bill Gates discusses progress. Nanoparticles have environmental impact. Journalism uses more social media.  Philosophy uses field experiments. AI attends to when computers will take over and Numenta hierarchical temporal memory. Human Enhancement: Bioliberation shown on video.

There were about twenty-eight recent links.

Book Reviews:

Data Analysis with Open Source Tools, Philipp K. Janert, 2010
This book discusses how to make models and mine data. The author provides caveats that that appearances often override data, decision makers use data for support rather than reasoning, ethics outweigh data, and many things cannot be measured yet. Realtime means right this minute rather than up to date. Data is cleaned prior to analysis. There are a couple of dozen software tools discussed. It uses math examples rather than code, for data analysis and calculus, and has a statistics refresher. There are interesting styles of plots. Some case studies are detailed. Each chapter has workshop exercises, an intermezzo for related topics, and further reading. There are four parts, eighteen chapters and three appendices. The reader interested in data filtering might need additional sources beyond the time series presented here.

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values, Sam Harris, 2010
This book proposes that science can address moral absolutes. If right and good relate to human and animal wll-being, then there are answers. The title is an analogy to a texture that has peaks for well-being and depths for suffering. Mental experience and values can be measured. Facts of the world can be assembled into knowledge. There can then be rational argument that results in the highest amount of well-being. This is an interesting discussion also presented in video lectures. There are five chapters which also include belief, religion and the future of happiness. There is heavy emphasis on topics related to brain science and structures and neuroimaging. The author likens the method to medicine or economics yet, while these are considered sciences, they are subject to significant errors, so there is also a need to understand how to improve the practice of the principles. The reader may also wonder if the brain will be the best processor for these types of decisions. The Monty Hall problem is discussed as a demonstration of the wisdom of switching, but this seems to be neutralized if contestants are split half on one side and half on the other so both would be better off switching.

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Good Idea

Posted by cadsmith on November 14, 2010

The internet remains a magnet for progress as it offers automated sports analysis, contextual intelligence, faster 32nm processor, datamining source code, a database of things, a social browser, social books, and a spaceship sim. Robotics is used as a home guard and actress. Sustainability makes a grand challenge. Comp sci invites philosophy. There are A/R glasses, hybrid Eurocopter, and floating city.

Book review:

Where Good Ideas Come From: the Natural History of Innovation, Steven Johnson, 2010

Good ideas are likely those that connect to eachother. Upon investigation of many events, myths had to be debunked. The author defines seven patterns of innovation and how they relate, including the Adjacent Possible, Liquid Networks, The Slow Hunch, Serendipity, Error, Exaptation, Platforms. A four quadrant diagram is used to classify breakthroughs as market, non-market, individual, or network. An appendix lists the major innovations of the previous six centuries.

Recent links (of about twenty-four):

video

FORA.tv – Steven Johnson: Where Good Ideas Come From

YouTube – Authors@Google: John C. Médaille

YouTube – The Neuropsychology of Self Control – and its Implications for AI [UKH+] (1/8)

YouTube – Eric Berlow: How complexity leads to simplicity

YouTube – Authors@Google: Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers on Collaborative Consumption

YouTube – Taking movies beyond Avatar – for under £100

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Point to Pole

Posted by cadsmith on October 10, 2010

The Pole

Political artifacts are sweeping much of the attention. Next generation designs consider networks, environment, globalization, and personalization. Architecture seems to be maintaining eyes and ears and administering disapproving dread on behalf of a someone or something in the central keep. Votes are predicted and ballots are built according to the pulse from purchases, product use and promotional responses for goodness’ sake. Some take the quest to the furthest outposts which then become the new melting pots. Others meld to media and march the machines in their stead. Statistics are a snapshot of what needs to be shaped next and there is a cloud of colors around the computation.

Recent links (about twenty-seven):

Book Reviews:

The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization’s Northern Future, Laurence C. Smith, 2010
The author is a professor of earth and atmospheric sciences. There are three parts for ten chapters. Each chapter provides trend data and describes what 2050 will be like. The forces are demographics, resource demand, globalization, climate change. These all include technology. Ground rules included no silver bullets or world war III or hidden genies, and the models are okay. There is a trend toward urbanization. Resource depletion is analyzed. Carbon-free energy sources include hydropower, wind and concentrated solar thermal power. Water is in contention between farmers and cities. Computer models indicate rising air temperatures in the north. Trade can increase around the north pole without need for major contention. There is a third wave of immigration to the northern rim and the arctic seabed. Ancestral traditions merge with modern business practices. Models of abrupt climate change indicate probability that northern fresh water will not be affected and it may redirect water to the south. The new north may be like the American West at the start of the nineteenth century.

video

YouTube – Hans Rosling: The good news of the decade?
YouTube – Digital Art@Google: James Tunick and Jack Toolin
YouTube – Barbara Block: Tagging tuna in the deep ocean
Tim Jackson’s economic reality check | Video on TED.com

application Ovi app wizard beta

censorship The .ly domain space to be considered unsafe | :Ben Metcalfe Blog

computation Technology Review: Blogs: arXiv blog: The Post-Singularity Future Of Astronomy

disaster A flood of toxic sludge – The Big Picture – Boston.com

ebooks Worldreader.org – Books for All

games

World of Warcraft: Cataclysm
IBM INNOV8: CityOne

government Tech CEOs tell US gov’t how to cut $1 trillion from deficit

ideas Kevin Kelly and Steven Johnson on Where Ideas Come From | Magazine

linkedin LinkedIn and PwC Launch Breakthrough Career Mapping Tool for College Students | LinkedIn – Public Relations

medical Berkeley Bionics

review ‘The Social Network’: A Review Of Aaron Sorkin’s Film About Facebook And Mark Zuckerberg | The New Republic

robotics

Boy of 15 fitted with robotic heart – Computer Chips & Hardware Technology | Geek.com
IEEE Spectrum: Humanoid Robots Rise. Now, Can They Walk?
IEEE Spectrum: Omniwheels Gaining Popularity in Robotics

security Collective Defense: Applying Public Health Models to the Internet (PDF)

space

Update: Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo Makes First Glide Flight | Autopia | Wired.com
The Space Game

statistics Truthy

tags FollowYours

tv Quick Tour – Google TV

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Area Than Light

Posted by cadsmith on August 23, 2010

NasaSolarSail

The real world gets a game layer, iris scanning, risks, relief, aquabatics and solar sails.  See new AI, telepresence and climate control videos. Smartphones support sign language, and publishing does augmented reality. Economists seek new values amid a network of cities. Machine learning gets a prediction API. Semantic web and simulation get faster. Cyberpunk titles get reviewed.

Original scifi Streetseekers and mystery Casadrome added to previous Last of the Humans. Also from Amazon.

Recent links (about 23):

ai

YouTube – Eliezer Yudkowsky – The Challenge of Friendly AI (1/3)

YouTube – Peter Molyneux demos Milo, the virtual boy

augmented-reality Can Augmented Reality Help Save the Print Publishing Industry?

books Global Catastrophic Risks, edited by Nick Bostrom and Milan M. Cirkovic, 2008

crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing Disaster Relief

economics America’s Lost Decade(s) – Umair Haque – Harvard Business Review

games YouTube – Seth Priebatsch: Building the game layer on top of the world

internet Technology Review: Blogs: Mims’s Bits: The Fear-Based Psychology of the “Internet Kill Switch”

machinelearning Google Prediction API – Google Code

mobile Better Than FaceTime? Researchers Test New Mobile Technology for Deaf

nanotech YouTube – The Weather Machine: Nano-Enabled Climate Control for the Earth – 1

ocean Innespace

optical Technology Review: Blogs: Mims’s Bits: Using Einstein’s Relativity to Speed up Supercomputer Simulations 10,000%

satellite NASA – Sailing Among the Stars

scifi

Infoquake, David Lewis Edelman, 2006

Halting State, by Charles Stross, 2007

The Mirrored Heavens, David J. Williams, 2008

search The Future of Internet Search – Project Syndicate

security Iris Scanners Create the Most Secure City in the World. Welcome, Big Brother | Fast Company

semantic-web Dr Dobbs – Semantic Web Bottleneck

social-networks Flowr. Real-time Collaboration, knowledge exchange and smart information flow.

telepresence YouTube – John Delaney: Wiring an interactive ocean

urban Beyond City Limits – By Parag Khanna | Foreign Policy

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Posted by cadsmith on February 22, 2008

Game Testing All in One”, Schultz & others, 2005, 511pp describes how software testing techniques can be applied to games. After a humorous introduction orients the reader to the differences between gamer and tester approaches (e.g. rules 1 & 2 taken from Hitchhiker’s Guide, & X-Files or Ice-Nine, respectively), the authors reveal their knowledge of some popular titles as well as methods for improving the user’s experience. Book chapters have exercises answered in appendices. The contents demonstrate how to dissect a game for testing, and drive the software and hardware components in both well-defined and ad-hoc fashions. Testers get to know the games inside out and often spend weeks working through the various phases until release. Beta, online and multiplayer testing are also covered. Automation tools are used (since the game AI usually isn’t responsible for the testing part, too). Document, form and test flow diagram templates are detailed in an appendix. There are links to some commercial and public-domain tools to support the effort, e.g. documentation in a wiki.

Testing of mobile devices is covered in a recent webcast. Equipment costs can be lowered using combined analyzer and generator components local to a test station or connected using web-enabled LXI and IEEE 1588 timing.

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