Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Posts Tagged ‘energy’

Spoilersphere

Posted by cadsmith on February 28, 2011

Intel has BIOS implementation test suite. YouEye performs eye-tracking during tests. Aspiritech testers apply Asperger’s. Microsoft uses controlled experiments for business. Landing page tests listed.

Interactive Fabrication does realtime 3D. Hololabs has a 3D augmented reality editor. NMQ has 3D radar mosaic.

Robot subs used for longer term periods. Demolition robot slices concrete. Self-aware robot models body, thoughts and theory of mind. Stochastic robots put themselves together and take others apart. Cheetah-Bot made for pursuit. Robot marathon completed. Segway solowheel is self-balancing. Snakebot reaches heart.

Atomic antennae do quantum transmission on chip. Organic microprocessor announced. Phononic produces advanced thermoelectric devices. Millimeter-scale computer chips are prototyped.

OpenMesh provides internet-less routing. Brain-computer interface does multi-tasking. Swype eases mobile text input. OnSwipe self-publishes for tablets. HelloFax does transmits online. Batteries do self-repair. Solar caps put on landfills.

CapLinked has private investing platform. Seismic Warning Systems alert before earthquakes. Disaster relief model handles chaos. Video monitor automatically detects life jackets.

Book Reviews:

The End of Discovery, Russell Stannard, 2010

This book is about philosophy of science. The argument is that basic science has found things that are fundamentally unknowable. The description of the state-of-the-art is accompanied by questions that show the current limits. The nature of consciousness and free will is brought up initially. Others deal with what things are, their causes, proof, measurement, observations, past occurrences, and how to select between theories. Figures are used to understandably illustrate complex propositions and a few equations. There are thirteen chapters.

The End of the Long Summer, Dianne Dumanoski, 2009

This is a lyrical treatment of many environmental ideas. The basic thesis is that a future based on climate change and global warming cannot be avoided. The ozone hole was a demonstration of industrial civilization’s side-effects and the fact that nature is unpredictable. Humans have learned to dance to the music, however business cannot proceed as usual. Shift is volatile and rapid. The destiny is not set since there are choices. Technofix is a temptation, for example geoengineering, but the proper values include life, resiliency, diversity and survivability in contrast to survivalism. There can be overconnectedness as in hypercoherence. Humanities’ place is on Earth. Conservationists hope that people will be able to still enjoy animals several millennia from now. The best statement may be Carson’s Silent Spring. This is a Massachusetts author. There are nine chapters.

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Mesh Plexus

Posted by cadsmith on February 20, 2011

Embedded quality concerns highlighted by Accenture. Test lab management organized by Parasoft Virtualize. Mutual Mobile tests enterprise apps. SOASTA performs cloud and mobile load tests. Strike has simple task manager. Google bookmarks imports directly from delicious.

Wolfram reviews Watson. Satellites learn to dodge obstacles. Roombots morph into furniture. Meka Robotics combines Kinect and ROS. Lasers transfer data on-chip. Antilaser absorbs light.

BrainDriver kit for mind over motorcar. Compare to driving while blind. Ants lead in network trails.

inboxQ sweeps Twitter Q&A. RIM acquires Gist contact manager. Greplin searches social media. Crowdsourcing may speed social development. Wikistrat observes how tech propels global middle. EFF reports expansion in federal surveillance. Hackers spoof news via Wi-Fi.

Doctor’s brief presents Tech and Medicine. Nurses are apprehensive of alarm fatigue. Human skin becomes printable. Nanobioconnect hosts directory.

Mississippi powers underwater turbines. Geothermal Energy plentiful in Iceland. There were thirty-one recent links.

Book Review:

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos, Brian Greene, 2011

Nine types of parallel universes are proposed including quilted, inflationary, brane, cyclic, landscape, quantum, holographic, simulated and ultimate. The questions include how to test these theories, e.g. involving features which are common, or correlated, to the known universe, possibly through computation, and whether they can be used to solve problems. Various components such as black holes, string theory, and branes are explored and related to each model. There are eleven chapters. Audio comments

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Ventral Casting

Posted by cadsmith on February 6, 2011

Apps for Development seeks evaluations. Sysadmins called to improve testability. Coverity leads market in automated software testing. Topicmarks does document summarization. Wrangler simplifies form-based data cleanup. Linked open data adds value. EMC released Greenplum visual language for big data. Canvas learning management system announced.

White house publishes innovation strategy. Startup America supports entrepreneurship. National Power Grid has security issues. FBI search engine developed. Local Motors announces transport design battle. National Security Space Strategy published. Russians resume plans for spaceplane. China announces 2020 science goals. Clean nuclear power is a priority in China. Japanese elderly not quick to accept bot care companions. RoboEarth networks bots globally. Surgeons communicate with nurse bots using gesture recognition. David Hanson’s bot heads advance.

Video discusses implants for humans and brains for bots. Heart cells are made from skin. Accelerometer is made of paper. Nestle tests products in huge stomach. Neer tracks group member locations. Ericsson texts money transfers. AT&T expands mobile banking. Walgreens fill prescriptions by cell cam. IntoNow promotes social TV. Digital museums are browsable in Google Art Project. There were thirty-three recent links.

Book Review:

Verification and Validation in Systems Engineering
This book looks at how architecture frameworks use SysML and UML 2.0. Techniques are classified as informal, static, dynamic or formal. These use inspection, testing, simulation, reference model equivalence checking and theorem proving. It proposes a unified approach to evaluate designs, including comparative metrics and procedures There is a case study of an ATM. Semantics, probabilistic behavior and performance analysis of activity diagrams are considered using the PRISM model. There are thirteen chapters.

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Info Ops

Posted by cadsmith on January 30, 2011

Data deluge includes new terms. State unites in Sputnik Moment prioritizing tech innovation. All-Seeing Eye test results in contention. Egyptian election revolt disconnects media excepting network surveillance. Cyber police activated in Iran. Facebook handles hacks from Tunisia. Bluetooth is useful to insurgents. Mobile phones are to be tested in space. Android 3.0 SDK announced. Digital docs use steganography. Universal memory seeks to replace flash and DRAM. Alternative energy may take about three more decades. Robot hands become more robust. Cloud bots get smarter. Visual microscopy automated. Autom supports weight reduction. There were twenty recent links.

Book review:

The Next Decade, George Friedman, 2010
This book looks at the near future of US foreign relations in terms of a realignment of the balance of power through actions of the President as Commander-in-Chief. There are two themes, the unintended empire, and whether it can be managed to allow the republic to survive. The US global military supports economic policy. Its President is always engaged in the art of war. This will move beyond recent fear of rising oil prices and Jihadist war and establish surrogates in each region. While democracy, human rights and social progress are still important, strategy becomes more of a concern than ideology. The issues are economic, geopolitical, demographic and technological. There is an aging population, contracting workforce, and lack of water. The state, in the form of the DoD, is more powerful than the market for long-term investment. On the American contents, Cuba is likely to be a target of influence, Latin America will include Brazil, Argentina and Mexico. The latter’s violence and corruption will be resisted at the border and cartels are expected to be in control there, while US hypocrisy will scapegoat members of its government staff during investigations. Canada is stable. In Asia, Korea, Australia and Singapore balance Chinese splintering and Japanese assertiveness. India surges economically, but is not a threat to China, and is balanced by Pakistan to keep its expenditures on Army and Air. In Europe, Brits’ interests are closer to US, and Poland is important to containment since Germany dominates economically, backed by France allied with Russian military which seeks to balance US with radical Islam. Denmark blocks Baltic sea exits. NATO is irrelevant. In the Middle East, US withdraws from Iraq, distances from Israel, and has detente with Iran. Sunni Turkey eventually rises and is important to Russian containment in Balkans and Caucasus. There are fourteen chapters.

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Net for Sale

Posted by cadsmith on January 9, 2011

US citizens to get Internet ID. LG ties smart grid to smartphones and tablets. Trimensional has 3D scanner for iphone. Factual has web and mobile APIs. Forrester says third of users will have tablets by 2015. Vuzix makes video eyeware. Videoscape promoted by Cisco service providers. Viewdle tags photos. Google Hotpot ranks realworld locations. Hipmunk does flight search. Clever Sense has location-aware concierge AI. Dedicated AIs are more successful. Hybrid Assistive Limb is a robotic exoskeleton. Industrial robot name Little Helper. OpenStack provides open-source for clouds. OpenStudy supports social study groups. DIASPORA open-source socnet in alpha. Minimal blogging editor outputs RSS. Feed.nu converts a blog to an android app. DKIM vouches for email. Social Security expects next computer to be years behind demand. Kneber botnet hits government. MAINGATE is new mobile defense network. Amazon Web Services used for wifi hacking research. Estonia starts cyber army. Wikistrat produces geopol journals. Eagleman looks at brains and behaviors. Convergence creates revolution in biomedicine. DNA test determines physical characteristics such as hair color. There is a digital Radiation Detector. Oil Prices begin to dig deeper. High tech Horse Show announced. Gilt Groupe carries luxury brands. Thirty-five recent links.

Book Reviews:

The Master Switch, Tim Wu, 2010

A separation principle of content from transport would maintain an open internet. The author discusses the history of telecommunications and describes an open-to-closed cycle. Convergence in this context means monopoly. This results from a paradox of how US consumers chose convenience over freedom. Other factors are network effects, power of integration, economies of scale, and will to power. There are five parts for twenty-one chapters.

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Pace Time

Posted by cadsmith on December 19, 2010

future of cities

Arbor graphs DDOS stats. The US is establishing an Internet Privacy Office. Supercomputer benchmark measures graph handling. CrisisCommons handles disaster data. List of computer mishaps. A simple site registration utility is provided by Facebook. S4 Momentum tracks social media. Social branding is marketed by Wildfire. Recommendations for Personal Media streaming. Spabba does bookmarking since delicious may be divested. SEO tips for ebooks. 750 Words has online writing editor. Video of Health 2.0 keynote by Tim O’Reilly. Contest offers health prize for in-patient predictions. Body Browser searches anatomy. Muro does browser-based art. Game development is free using UDK. Film-like mocap improves games. Cyborg beetles can fly. PR2 robots sold. Humanoid bot announced in France. Automated round vac prototyped. Startup tech trends listed in addition to Crowdfunding and Chile. Molten Salt stores energy. MapQuest has site in US. Thirty-one recent links added.

Books Reviews:

Intelligent User Interfaces: Adaptation and Personalization Systems and Technologies, Panagiotis and Germanakos, 2008

This book is about how to improve findability. Major sections include theory, content, process, applications and security. Personalization refers to an individual’s or group’s unique needs and preferences. Adaptive features fit to these, context, and structure. Some of the common topics are user profiles, recommendation, models, hypermedia and e-government. Seventeen studies by thirty-eight contributors discuss categories such as privacy-enhanced personalization, emotional intelligence, e-learning assistants, open learner modeling, digital memories, cognitive style, adaptive parallel media stream servers, web usage mining, visualization methods, ontology-based, semantically adaptive, intelligent information, middleware architecture, web-based instruction, access/navigation/search, and adaptive hypermedia.

Surviving Cyberwar, Stiennon 2010
This book details methods of cyber intelligence. Cyberwar is dated from 2008 since, though there were network attacks a decade before, they were not coordinated military offensives. The author proposes four essential pillars which drive the war: technology, logistics, command and intelligence. Cases of social media being used for this as geopolitical tools are shown. Trojans are effective. Denial of service, the classic internet asault, is currently defended in ad hoc fashion. The simple assumption by network and endpoint security are that eachother are hostile, similarly by data for the user. It looks at the level of preparedness of major states and explains the US CNCI. Counterespionage has entered a new age. Future government depends upon how network security and privacy develop. There are fifteen chapters. It was published before the wikileaks controversy.

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Time Leaves Turns

Posted by cadsmith on September 27, 2010

foliage

There are signs of life swimming against the tidal forces. One may wonder how to test determinism itself, outside of philosophical scenarios. IT permeates most, if not all, domains. The fact that the volume of data exceeds comprehension invites advanced methods. Some of these preserve values. The inherent ideology affects conclusions. It is not clear how to prevent this. It is also a challenge to characterize it, but there seems to be a growing awareness of its significance going forward. In order to prevent narrow-minded short-sightedness, there are proposed diversities which mimic nature, however these can be bypassed through clever systemic exploitation of knowledge gaps or compartmentalization. This also occurs in analysis and operations. The security that defends also biases. Historically, things which are not protected tend to be plundered. Software is considered a work-around for bureaucracy, science a progression toward truth. Setting them at logger heads may have spectacular effects, as hardware can attest. If this is necessary, then a perceptive observer of the resultant chaos may discover an approach that surpasses the past. The next trick is to show the math.

Recent links (twenty-one):

Book Reviews:

JFK and the Unspeakable, James Douglass, 2008

This narrative covers the background to the fateful day. The thesis is that the protagonist, following the missile crisis, threw himself in the way of a nuclear bullet headed for the country. His predecessor had warned of a mil-industrial complex. The antagonist is a then Cold War organization, portrayed as acting like a separate state after he decapitated it, who saw withdrawal from the proxy war in Vietnam as a defeat. The title uses a phrase from theologian Thomas Merton. There are six chapters and an appendix speech. The author reportedly intended it as the start of a series which would also include MLK, MX and RFK.
zero history, William Gibson, 2010

The book describes a quest for military fashion. It is a character-driven continuation from the previous two novels which includes recent economic context. They have distinct manners and voices and are each chasing their own cultural trends. The title is about a character who has no credit record and the news assumes a death spiral. There is a lot of depth. Cool is yet unadvertised. Expert at their tradecraft, the players tend to go rogue. The setting is described in detail, London is like an “intricate antique toy … bought at auction”. Brand images from realworld things are compared like apps made from root code or true worth. It includes authentic samples of elite terminology. Locative art became augmented reality. Tracking is ubiquitous. The big ant figurine symbol shows up in luggage. There are eighty-seven chapters. Point-of-view changes among the major characters other than Big End. The audiobook lends it a voiceover quality.

video

YouTube – Steven Johnson: Where good ideas come from
Reconstructing Minds from Software Mindfiles « K21st – Essential 21st Century Knowledge

AI

CyBeRev Home

LifeNaut –

blog Windows Live Outsources Blogging, Migrating 30 Million Users To WordPress.com

calendar Welcome to CalendarGod

climate NASA – NASA Study Shows Desert Dust Cuts Colorado River Flow

energy Using Clean Technology to Remedy Energy Poverty: Scientific American

geospatial CIA used ‘illegal, inaccurate code to target kill drones’ • The Register

government BetaCities

profile ResumeSponge

quantum Kiwi scientists make atomic ‘breakthrough’ | Stuff.co.nz

robotics Flying Robot Swarm Takes Off | Wired Science | Wired.com

security Virus Targets Industrial OS, Reaches Iran’s Nuclear Plant

space First Habitable Exoplanet Could Be Discovered by May | Wired Science | Wired.com

test Performance Testing | Performance Testing Resources

voice VoiceBase

wireless Super-tough wireless sensors ‘to be dropped into volcanoes’ • The Register

women Sharp Skirts Smart Networking for Women Entrepreneurs

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Praxis Upheaval

Posted by cadsmith on May 15, 2010

TheForeOfTimes

Information layers seem to spiral as data doubles every year or so. This may find its way to storage structures for accessibility and analysis. In the meantime, semantics do heavy lifting, while users choose centricity, e.g. actor, method, device, network, or space, and match measures to media. Any location may resolve to surface, signal, transform, translation, filter or fractal. Recent links:

Visualization, VTK, Protovis, prefuse; 3D, Autodesk Inventor, camera, Gemvision; Robotics, Anybots telepresence; Socnets, OpenID Connect, OneSocialWeb, Udemy online courses; Translation, Google audio; Security, KHOBE shreds Windows walls,  Verizon cloud; Quantum atomic optical computing, location-based cryptography; Energy, EIA Annual Energy Outlook has a national energy modeling system (NEMS), and scenarios to 2035. smart grid, again; Space, Moon Zoo, multiverse; Psychology, Analyze Words twitter sentiment,  internet improves well-being; Documents of note: The Fate of the Semantic Web, Pew Research, 2010 (pdf), On the Essence of Truth, Martin Heidegger, 1943.

Book reviews:

Re-Designing Learning Contexts, Luckin 2010. This book concentrates on technological literacy for personal and collaborative education. Luckily, it was available for Kindle. Scholars are defining what knowledge is, and it is up to the participant to try to find improvements, learn from failure and synthesize resources. The author, an expert from the UK who will be keynoting the ICICTE conference, highlights interaction and presents the equivalent of a slideshow narrative on the status and needs of the learner. This follows previous work on learning outside of school, holistically within a lifetime. About four hundred publications are organized into nine chapters relating to three parts of background, ecology and future. Context is internalized enough to become independent of elements such as place, culture and technology. For example, Paul Dourish is significant for notion of embodied interaction. Historical approaches include information processing, behaviorism, constructivism, scaffolding in the form of hints or next steps, zone of collaboration, and cognition. Types of learners are supported by more able partners (MAPs). Many software solutions are discussed which emphasize combinations of discussion, tutorials, videos, multiple representations, visualization and simulation, distributed scaffolding, recognizing learner beliefs, collaboration and props such as toys. An ecology of resources model defines filter elements for knowledge and skills, tools and people, and environment. Case studies are distinguished by creation process (brainstorm, focus of attention, categorization, filters, resources, MAPs), relationships, and scaffolds. Interaction models structure conversation, scaffolding design, learner context, and locale and mobile frameworks. A practice example uses lesson plans, whiteboard, tablets and homework activities. Some of the web2.0 terms are used such as tagging and crowdsourcing. Links are given for resources, e.g. rixcentre.org which handles learning disabilities. An attempt to use http://www.autotutor.org appeared inconclusive since it did not seem to understand typed answers on well-known subjects, such as how the internet might be (re)designed, and hand-waving, e.g. to draw gravity wells to show how differently sized objects might respond to eachother, were not allowed. To be fair, the same word problem was completely incomprehensible to a cloud math engine so there is a ways to go for these approaches to be general purpose or compatible with other large scale efforts such as EarthGame.

The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves, Arthur 2009. This book presents a theory of technology which directs human life, is beneficial and results in economic arrangements and activities. It is alive in the sense of a coral reef, yet separate from incremental biology which may yet become technology. It involves combinatorial evolution shaped by demand, modularity, recursive structure, and mechanistic bootstrapping. Structures are deepened by subcomponents for performance, monitoring, adaptation, and reliability. The theory is derived from scientific evolution and self-correcting paradigms. It also drives economics which is non-deterministic. The result is physical, yet digitization is the currency. The needs arise from growth of society, support of tech itself, and fixes. Innovation tends to be nation-centric based on deep craft of local cultures. Technology is a means to fulfill a human purpose, the idea of use or programming of a phenomenon for some purpose and resultant cultural practices, components, devices and engineering principles and architecture. Standard engineering aims to solve problems. Invention occurs by mental association. Concepts are realized in physical form. Clusters of common theory form domains which can be categorized hierarchically. Innovation may involve redomaining, e.g. in economics. Solutions become components for further developments.
The reader can make some criticisms. When it comes to theories, testing and falsification of premises and claims are usually required. This one does not show the math nor discuss limits, e.g. due to scale or sustainability. It is predictive only in a causal sense since scientific instruments are a form of technology which discover new phenomena which result in new technologies. Human evolution includes all knowledge and activities, so any particular area, e.g. technology, may already be considered part of this. There are discussions elsewhere that global networks are more for communication than economics and may be prone to politicization. The ROI example of Columbus in the New World may actually be cautionary for indigenous natives. There are risks for controlled ownership by big corporations on one side or open-source and commons on the other. Discussion of robotics, or requirements for education or ethics, for example, would require additional sources.

The Grammar of Technology Development, edited by Tsubaki and others, 2008. The theme is methodologies for quantifying technology development. Idea is based on “The Grammar of Science” 1892 using statistics. A grammar is a description of approaches for selection of the most effective. Three parts provide a total of fourteen papers covering systematic modes, design of experiments and statistical methods. Digital engineering makes use of computer aided engineering, quality control, simulation, verification and validation. The technology development process can be modeled for interactions between virtual and real society. Systems science can also make use of intuition in micro-theories of knowledge creation which are several orders of magnitude better at information processing than verbalization and includes the collective unconscious. Spiral processes in a creative space use dimensions of objectivity, subjective, intersubjective, justification and reflection. Ecodesign is environmentally conscious and has compatible tools. Social networks show useful gaps in three types of communications: interactive, distributed, and soapbox. Simulation matches theoretical and actual conditions and tests the model, its own issues can be compensated for by calibration in the design of experiment. Measures for performance evaluation include hardware simulation, software simulation, and approximate analysis. Several case studies are shown for an example product, digital factory, web-legacy client-server system, and musical search by humming. Many of the articles introduce keywords for the statistical concepts used in that type of grammar and use figure and tables to illustrate the most significant data. This book was the result of a conference of several different authors so it is left to the reader to correlate the ideas. The case seems promising and the combined use will likely lead to additional efforts that can be evaluated for improvements or automation.

Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology, edited by Pearson and Young, 2002. Planning for the future involves significant emphasis on society, economics, and environment. These in turn depend upon development of technology to solve problems, lower costs, and use resources more efficiently. Somewhere along the line of familiarity with a single tool, science experience, and engineering, there is a general technology skill. As values and philosophy are revealed, there seem to be no clearcut definitions of exactly what an essential approach would be or how to recognize the better ones from many attempts. A question arises as to how to remedy this. Education is the usual answer and this then raises another issue of how to teach technology. This book centers around the notion of technology literacy, including capabilities, knowledge and ways of doing. The theme is nationalistic, though international attitudes are described. Some of the problems, e.g. lack of understanding of the electrical grid, have since had new solutions such as smart grid to compensate by automating some of the decision-making. This book is clearly written, formatted like a textbook with boxed summaries and reading lists. This is a subject which can be taken for granted only at peril since the ongoing changes in population, demographics, ideologies and climate seem to be increasing in complexity at faster rates over time. Free complete online preview at http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=10250.

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