Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Posts Tagged ‘cloud’

Mesh Plexus

Posted by cadsmith on February 20, 2011

Embedded quality concerns highlighted by Accenture. Test lab management organized by Parasoft Virtualize. Mutual Mobile tests enterprise apps. SOASTA performs cloud and mobile load tests. Strike has simple task manager. Google bookmarks imports directly from delicious.

Wolfram reviews Watson. Satellites learn to dodge obstacles. Roombots morph into furniture. Meka Robotics combines Kinect and ROS. Lasers transfer data on-chip. Antilaser absorbs light.

BrainDriver kit for mind over motorcar. Compare to driving while blind. Ants lead in network trails.

inboxQ sweeps Twitter Q&A. RIM acquires Gist contact manager. Greplin searches social media. Crowdsourcing may speed social development. Wikistrat observes how tech propels global middle. EFF reports expansion in federal surveillance. Hackers spoof news via Wi-Fi.

Doctor’s brief presents Tech and Medicine. Nurses are apprehensive of alarm fatigue. Human skin becomes printable. Nanobioconnect hosts directory.

Mississippi powers underwater turbines. Geothermal Energy plentiful in Iceland. There were thirty-one recent links.

Book Review:

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos, Brian Greene, 2011

Nine types of parallel universes are proposed including quilted, inflationary, brane, cyclic, landscape, quantum, holographic, simulated and ultimate. The questions include how to test these theories, e.g. involving features which are common, or correlated, to the known universe, possibly through computation, and whether they can be used to solve problems. Various components such as black holes, string theory, and branes are explored and related to each model. There are eleven chapters. Audio comments

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In Media Res

Posted by cadsmith on February 14, 2011

Pen.io publishes pages. SpeakerText does transcription. TigerText does secure texting. Mobile Basecamp released. Automated reading clarifies historic maps. Cloud contest announced. HP challenges Google for cloud. Paygr does service classifieds. DIY blogs Ramshackle Solid and Homegrown Evolution feature case studies.

Universal flu vaccine handles all strains. DNA adhesives used to label valuables.

Anonymous claims Stuxnet source. Night Dragon virus penetrates energy firm systems. Medical Device Innovation Initiative fast tracks regulatory approvals. Unmanned combat air system US Navy X-47B tested.

Motorika provides robotic rehab. Affetto does realistic faces. Bilibot Project makes robotics cheaper. eRockit and YikeBike offer electric bikes.

Nanowires do computing. On-chip photonics speed up processing. There were twenty-five recent links.

Book review:

Verification and Validation in Scientific Computing, Oberkampf and Roy, 2010

Scientific computing is finding more uses in engineering and research. This book is about model verification. The questions are how well a simulation matches an actual activity, or how to get experimental data for a mathematics of micro- and nano-scales, and whether reviewers will find the results credible. Verification activities are shown for software, solution, model and management. Predictive capability is summarized in several steps for identifying sources of uncertainty, characterizing them, estimating error and uncertainty in the system response quantities (SRQs), updating the model, and analyzing sensitivities. There are five parts for sixteen chapters, and an appendix.

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Net for Sale

Posted by cadsmith on January 9, 2011

US citizens to get Internet ID. LG ties smart grid to smartphones and tablets. Trimensional has 3D scanner for iphone. Factual has web and mobile APIs. Forrester says third of users will have tablets by 2015. Vuzix makes video eyeware. Videoscape promoted by Cisco service providers. Viewdle tags photos. Google Hotpot ranks realworld locations. Hipmunk does flight search. Clever Sense has location-aware concierge AI. Dedicated AIs are more successful. Hybrid Assistive Limb is a robotic exoskeleton. Industrial robot name Little Helper. OpenStack provides open-source for clouds. OpenStudy supports social study groups. DIASPORA open-source socnet in alpha. Minimal blogging editor outputs RSS. Feed.nu converts a blog to an android app. DKIM vouches for email. Social Security expects next computer to be years behind demand. Kneber botnet hits government. MAINGATE is new mobile defense network. Amazon Web Services used for wifi hacking research. Estonia starts cyber army. Wikistrat produces geopol journals. Eagleman looks at brains and behaviors. Convergence creates revolution in biomedicine. DNA test determines physical characteristics such as hair color. There is a digital Radiation Detector. Oil Prices begin to dig deeper. High tech Horse Show announced. Gilt Groupe carries luxury brands. Thirty-five recent links.

Book Reviews:

The Master Switch, Tim Wu, 2010

A separation principle of content from transport would maintain an open internet. The author discusses the history of telecommunications and describes an open-to-closed cycle. Convergence in this context means monopoly. This results from a paradox of how US consumers chose convenience over freedom. Other factors are network effects, power of integration, economies of scale, and will to power. There are five parts for twenty-one chapters.

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Being Wells

Posted by cadsmith on November 28, 2010

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The internet-of-things will use a mobile embedded SIM chip. Notebook apps include Simplenote, Org-Mode and alternatives. Aviary added an HTML5 Photo Editor. Formstack eases editing. Mastermind allows hands-free game play. Search considers serendipity. Feds aim for cloud option. Trusted Secure Computing is presented in Europe. API usage is clarified. Kaggle aggregates datamining competitors. Data Compression is based on a card trick.

The health industry expects more networks, bots, ad artifacts. Biotech reviews ramifications of ID implants. A mobile camera drone has bird’s eye view. Bots rescue the battle-ridden. Communities reevaluate economics. Futurist Bill Gates discusses progress. Nanoparticles have environmental impact. Journalism uses more social media.  Philosophy uses field experiments. AI attends to when computers will take over and Numenta hierarchical temporal memory. Human Enhancement: Bioliberation shown on video.

There were about twenty-eight recent links.

Book Reviews:

Data Analysis with Open Source Tools, Philipp K. Janert, 2010
This book discusses how to make models and mine data. The author provides caveats that that appearances often override data, decision makers use data for support rather than reasoning, ethics outweigh data, and many things cannot be measured yet. Realtime means right this minute rather than up to date. Data is cleaned prior to analysis. There are a couple of dozen software tools discussed. It uses math examples rather than code, for data analysis and calculus, and has a statistics refresher. There are interesting styles of plots. Some case studies are detailed. Each chapter has workshop exercises, an intermezzo for related topics, and further reading. There are four parts, eighteen chapters and three appendices. The reader interested in data filtering might need additional sources beyond the time series presented here.

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values, Sam Harris, 2010
This book proposes that science can address moral absolutes. If right and good relate to human and animal wll-being, then there are answers. The title is an analogy to a texture that has peaks for well-being and depths for suffering. Mental experience and values can be measured. Facts of the world can be assembled into knowledge. There can then be rational argument that results in the highest amount of well-being. This is an interesting discussion also presented in video lectures. There are five chapters which also include belief, religion and the future of happiness. There is heavy emphasis on topics related to brain science and structures and neuroimaging. The author likens the method to medicine or economics yet, while these are considered sciences, they are subject to significant errors, so there is also a need to understand how to improve the practice of the principles. The reader may also wonder if the brain will be the best processor for these types of decisions. The Monty Hall problem is discussed as a demonstration of the wisdom of switching, but this seems to be neutralized if contestants are split half on one side and half on the other so both would be better off switching.

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Endgame

Posted by cadsmith on November 21, 2010

Approaching the conclusion of the year, predictions for the next begin with announcements for the cloud and security. An easier messaging system is introduced for Facebook and AI may eventually use data. Gravity graphs interests. Ipad may have a new digital newspaper. A personal network supports photography. Indeed searches business classifies. States publish statistics. Developers can use head or gestural interfaces. Augmented reality is used to compose music. Robots learn by doing. Radio uses saltwater antenna. Stuxnet may have been built to change nuclear processing. Drones can survey Mars. Fins offered as prosthetics. A teacher plans to put a camera inside back of head. Climate is answerable to science. Carbon nanotubes are inflammable. Maxwell’s demon has been demonstrated. There are contests for movies, and med and bio images.

Recent links (from about twenty-eight):

This Video Will Blow Your Mind (Probably) | The Creators Project
YouTube – Authors@Google: Kevin Kelly
YouTube – Digital Art@Google: DJ Spooky

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To Be Is To Question

Posted by cadsmith on November 7, 2010

IBM personalizes internet. Australia has a digital city. Adobe adds cloud filesharing. Verify gets user feedback on screens. Impure visualizes data. A biological brain navigates a vehicle. In electric cars, a Chevy gets an IP address, and an Urbee is made on printer. Also in 3D, Janus does interactive scanning and holograms do displays. Invisible material disappears. Chip PC is in the plug. Blekko searches selected sites. Gdb does profiling. Sensors warn of landslides. Technoscience combines science and engineering.

Book reviews:

What Technology Wants, Kevin Kelly, 2010
The author seeks the essence of technology as a force the equal of nature. Technology has features such as evolution, complexity, specificity, diversity, and energy dependencies. He introduces the term technium as a form of civilization, an emergent system of accelerated life. Many advancements happen simultaneously in multiple places, e.g. the Axial Age. This is the result of new technologies increasing the odds of successors. There are four parts for fourteen chapters. It is written in an optimistic, mind-expanding style. He covers the ideas of many other authors such as Joel Garreau and W. Brian Arthur. There are twenty-books in the reading list including authors such as Ray Kurzweil and Steward Brand. Though not cited here, there have been efforts to formalize technology’s philosophical roots, theory, and predictions, reviewed earlier on this blog and google books.

Recent links (of about twenty-four):

video

YouTube – Tom Chatfield: 7 ways video games engage the brain
YouTube – Authors@Google: Alice Walker

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Nu Matters

Posted by cadsmith on September 19, 2010

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Some of the big names in their fields announce changes of opinion including Tim Berners-Lee, Stephen Hawking, and Chris Adnerson of TED. Rob Dunbar talks about ocean acidification. Nicholas Christakis forecasts epidemics from socnet analysis. Problems are being redefined and prioritized. Predictions for next year have begun. New products push the limits of mobility, computation and automation. Weather Waker original scifi can be read on Scribd and Amazon.

Recent links (about forty):

Book reviews:

Cyber War, Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake, 2010

The author discusses govnet, his proposal for private critical infrastructure networks, which the internet architects and privacy advocates were not supportive of. The first third of the book describes the way things are setup and the rest goes into defensive and offensive strategies. The actors are described such as state-run cyber warriors like Russia’s successor to FAPSI, or nationalist hacker groups. Defenses try to promote security by filtering attacks or by disrupting the parts of the network that are required for them to operate. These are non-lethal, but may lead to other types of warfare. There are costs to cyber-crime which demand better counter-measures. There is a speech at the end that sums up the recommendations for a treaty, risk reduction center, and cooperation among victim nations. There are eight chapters and a glossary, but no index. The problems and solutions are ongoing. National servers are used within the cloud framework to protect important data. Countries seek to monitor all types of traffic for security reasons, e.g. Blackberry decryption by India. This becomes sensitive when data may be used for commercial advantage. Other nations may develop their own advancements for private or global networking, such as China’s post-IP efforts.

The Grand Design, Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow, 2010

Philosophy is dead, science makes the discoveries. M-theory is a candidate for a theory of everything. Descartes formulated the concept of rules of nature. Laplace postulated scientific determinism. Brains follow physical causes. Free will is an illusion, yet economics is based on it. Reality is a model and set of rules connected to observations. The book reviews the history of physics, e.g. Feynman, and concludes that the universe is a part of a multiverse, some of which have life, and began from nothing as a quantum event.

Digital Triage Forensics: Processing the Digital Crime Scene, Pearson and Watson, 2010

This process is intended to eliminate the overly busy lab delays between evidence gathering and analysis. It is different from the in-country RCFLs that are also backlogged. It has been used by Weapons Intelligence Teams since 2004 for cell phones and SIM cards which were used as part of tactical operations, activity records for payment, or detonators. Inspection is initially carried out by TALON robot. Photography in the dark avoids white light which may be targeted or interfere with others’ night-vision. Investigator bias is an issue for defense attorneys. The forensics exam consists of preparation, collection, examination, analysis and reporting. A computer BIOS’ clock may be set differently from standard time, so it must be checked and matched by forensic apps. Data on a cellphone can be accessed by other devices over networks or the cloud. There are specialized applications to review, bookmark and copy data from mobile devices and storage cards for investigative reports, e.g. for contacts, messages, call history and content. There is a glossary. Also see mobileforensics.wordpress.com or www.nfstc.org.

Point Omega, Don DeLillo, 2010

The visual mind consists of heat, space, stillness, distance, and time observes the narrator. “We want to be stones in a field” according to the subject of his film about a military analyst named Elster who also says that “The true life is not reducible to words…”. The title derives from their discussion about the evolution of matter and de Chardin’s ideas, a paroxysm, but the subject also desires another war to shape history. They do discuss the meaning of words like rendition. There is a lot of detail about the narrator’s and subject’s impressions of eachother and others. Elster’s daughter visits and the disappearances of she and the caretaker lead to a number of clues including those from his wife. Some disconnected scenes add others. The emotion of foreboding is enhanced by the prologue and epilogue in third person in 2006 where the author describes the viewing, and fateful viewers of, a slow-motion Hitchcock film which he saw several times and was where he got the idea for the novel. The middle four chapters are in first person. This number may be analogous to the stages of matter, humours or seasons referenced in the text. Both narrators discuss concepts of time, words, and film. The settings are NYC and the desert.

automotive

EFuel100, Earth’s First Home Ethanol System, a Product of E-Fuel Corporation

Welcome to BUMP!

benchmark Kraken JavaScript Benchmark

books

No Plot? No Problem!, Chris Baty, 2004

How to Write a Damn Good Novel Volume II, Frey 1994

climate

IEEE Spectrum: Pure-form Big Chill Scenario Seems Vindicated

Scientists warn geo-engineering unlikely to curb dramatic sea rise

cloud Strategy Roundtable: 5 Cloud Computing Opportunities for Entrepreneurs

cms Jambok

design 7 Excellent Websites To Get Design Feedback Visually Instead Of Emailing Back And Forth | Free and Useful Online Resources for Designers and Developers

marketing QR Codes: Are You Ready For Paper-Based Hyperlinks?

metal Neither Pen Nor Pencil: Write Endlessly In Metal | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

mobile

Pew Survey Finds Predictable Trends Among Mobile Phone Users

Internet Founder Tim Berners-Lee Details 4 Concerns About Future of Mobile Web (Nokia World 2010)

multitouch Multi-touch Technologies for Human-Robot Interaction: UMass Lowell Robotics Lab

network 5 Ways Networking is Being Reinvented

ocean YouTube – Rob Dunbar: The threat of ocean acidification

prediction Nicholas Christakis: How social networks predict epidemics | Video on TED.com

robotics

The HRP-4 humanoid robot unveiled

Honda’s Exoskeletons Help You Walk Like Asimo (video) | Singularity Hub

science Chinese science and technology has long way to go, says Russian expert

scribd The future of reading and publishing is social – Introducing new Scribd home and profile pages – The Scribd Blog

security

Mobile Forensics Central

E-Evidence Information Center – Home

Briggs Softworks: Directory Snoop – File Recovery and Wiping Software for Windows

simulation How galaxies are born inside computers

social-media Seven Important Social Media Trends For The Next Year

software Dr Dobbs – Google Relaunches Instantiations Developer Tools; Now Available for Free

surveillance Technology Review: Blogs: TR Editors’ blog: Intel Outlines An Era of Friendly Surveillance

test

Dr Dobbs – Code Coverage, Performance Profiling Tools Released

uTest Lands $13 Million For Software Testing Marketplace

transportation What happens when you leave a skateboard and a tank alone in a dimly lit room? (video) — Engadget

video YouTube – Chris Anderson: How web video powers global innovation

wearable Looxcie Wearable Camcorder: Capture Unexpected Moments

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In Turn Troth

Posted by cadsmith on August 17, 2010

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The internet wants to be the answer. It has tied together all of the testimonials and provided search to find sources, and rankings to reveal the best. Women can review unbiased medical advice, and patients all of their records. It can reshape itself from smartphones if needed. Show sensors tell people what to hear. Robotics reports progress in batteries, walking, emotions and space travel. The brain is almost mapped. Beyond scifi, the imagination is also scenic, intriguing and mysterious.

Recent links (twenty-two):

answers

Sprouter
Swingly | It’s time you got some answers.

books The Scene Book: A Primer for the Fiction Writer, Sandra Scofield, 2007

cloud

Exploring How to Build a Cloud With Smartphones – ReadWriteCloud
IBM’s Cloud Computing Coming to a Hospital Near You
4 Tools for Assessing Cloud Performance – ReadWriteCloud

cognitive Reverse-Engineering of Human Brain Likely by 2030, Expert Predicts | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

fiction Foreign Influence, Brad Thor, 2010

manufacturing Global Guerrillas: RESILIENT COMMUNITY: Forget Afghanistan, These are Needed in Detroit etc.

medical ChickRx: Expert Info on Sex, Fitness, Relationships, Dermatology, and Health

ranking

FindTheBest.com | Find. Compare. Decide.
The Best Top 10, Top 100 & More Lists: List Making is Easy at Ranker | Ranker – A World of Lists

rfid Sensors On Broadway: Live Performances Enhanced by RFID

robotics

Boston-Power heads to the moon – Boston Business Journal
A Robot Capable of Developing Bonds and Showing Emotions
IEEE Spectrum: Iran’s Humanoid Robot Surena 2 Walks, Stands on One Leg (Video)
Robot to escort on space shuttle mission: NASA – International Business Times

scifi

Kraken, China Mieville, 2010
Terminal World, Alastair Reynolds, 2010
The Dervish House, Ian McDonald, 2010

startup Never Mind the Valley: Here’s Montreal

writing How to Write a Damn Good Mystery, James N Frey, 2004

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Rainbow Positioning System

Posted by cadsmith on May 5, 2010

afterParty

Following request for comment, new ideas may invoke defensiveness in some, delightful evaluation in others, and possibly incomprehension requiring eventual rediscovery in yet others. Media is emergent though not yet autonomous. It still takes conscious people to make meaning of change, or to consider relevance and consequence. Automated research may eventually yield familiar forms of presentations, but automated reality may seem comparatively upside-down if information density increases by miniaturization. This would be a new context for adaptation. Perhaps philosophy can reinforce and extend the scale of tech and scope of cultural dependencies, if it can survive inquiry. Predicting business requires betting on future value.

Recent bookmarks. Futurict promotes a sustainability clearinghouse. Academia.edu has a topic researcher directory. NASA astrobiology site. Japan plans a lunar robot. Acquia discusses cloud webservice hosting architecture in video. Amsterdam’s Usabilla supports website testing. Spirent offers cloud testing. Pogoplug adds USB cloud storage. Layar hosts an augmented reality marketplace. Textie.me does ipad messsaging. Dailyplaces produces location-based microblogging. Google living stories is now on wordpress.

Book reviews include:

Decoding Reality: The Universe as Quantum Information, Vlatko Vedral, 2010. The news is that a symmetrical pair of processes, the second law of thermodynamics and derived meaning, are enough to generate reality. This bootstraps the existence of information which outweighs matter and energy, while the universe moves to maximize entropy and disorder, and we embody natural laws. That provides a source of ideas which the scientific method, or its analogs in other disciplines, turns into rules of nature. Quantum physics reveals meaning and the other side of the story of creation. The author synthesizes a coherent framework for quantum information science. Landauer’s principle that information is physical, where entropy is proportional to surface area, inspires a combination with Shannon’s information as inverse probability, Boltzmann’s constant, and qubits, to yield randomness at small scales and determinism at large. Twelve chapters explore perspectives of biology, thermodynamics, economics, computer science, sociology, philosophy and quantum physics. Each chapter mixes explanation, observation, anecdotes and humor, and is followed by a summary of the key points. Applications include cryptography, teleportation, climate, diet, segregation and gambling. Literature sources include Popper, Smolin, and Singh. Compare publications by Seth Lloyd, George Johnson, Michael Nielsen and Isaac Chuang, Amir Aczel or Raymond Kurzweil. The challenge is to integrate gravity to quantum physics.

Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto, Stewart Brand, 2009 This book ambitiously attempts to capture trends in the areas of climate change, urbanization and biotech. There is a lot of data and requirements for much more. It is wordy and tries to wrap a scientific narrative.around things that hold promise for solving issues. The author is optimistic that new tech will provide alternatives and that human nature will shed romanticism for pragmatism. This is a unique datapoint along the scales that, for other authors, would produce do it yourself instructions, computation engines, cognitive advances, nanomanufacturing, human genetic engineering, martial law, or extinction.. It is rather a wholesome approach that prescribes sober effort to get hard data, especially needed about oceans, so that a feasible bearing can be selected from among these currents amid changing forecasts. Readers are treated to statistics about the “city planet” or unlimited growth and economics which include cell phones, electricity, squatters and crime. Nuclear power has become a commodity at the same time as weapons foreshadow the high cost of failure. The upside of genetically modified crops and foods, microbes, metagenomics, and biofuels is examined. Big nations will figure out solutions and curb their toxic tendencies. The author’s roots in the whole earth catalog revisit conservationism, native American Indians, and the oratory of Jerry Brown. This is an anthropocene age demanding new ethics and politics. There is a lot to criticize and be cautious about, which is also the point since the folklore arguments have become outmoded. The resolve is biased and it makes demands of near-future generations which may have local dissenters. The human eye can discriminate shades the most for the color green so that label may not automatically be a consensus builder. As far as the presentation, the layout could stand some alterations, e.g. to add graphics, swap the multi-page bullets for conciseness, and highlight conclusions amid the alternating pluses and minuses. The author was an originator of notions of planetary consciousness who still knows the players so this may be a brief breath of fresh air for those bogged down by confusing terminology and contradictory innovations.

The Windup Girl, Paolo Bacigalupi, 2009 The author presents a very detailed rendering of a near-term survivalist future where the biological clock has been conquered and greed drives society. The genre has been termed biopunk and also has touches of steampunk. A corrupt centralized Thai government controls the population. Corporate foodstuffs are genetically modified and licensed, and plague terrorists maintain scarcity levels for demand and prices. Scientists create synthetic animals and people as slaves. The characters are representative of the major functions of each of the sectors who try their best to succeed, and are combined in various ways to heighten the drama. They see each other through blinders that support their own egotistic biases. The author builds up elaborate structures and then destroys them, naturally, in personal spats, and in battle. A belief in reincarnation rationalizes the sacrifices. The story is told in third person omniscient perspective and, at emotionally intense times, has brief first person thoughts in italics. Each of the fifty chapters is a type of cliff-hanger. The cover art is representative of many of the characteristic elements including the big four-tusked megadonts and their mahouts, dirigibles, and green methane lamps. Some of the characters are from previous short stories. The title New Person combines DNA refinement, extraordinary training, robotic obedience, the resignation of a prisoner, jittery movements for identification, and perfect skin with pores too tiny to cool temperature enough. Others are used as soldiers in Vietnam. This is a cynical world where each potential improvement seems to engender constraints that neutralize or outweigh it. Blade Runner had replicants, but they were used off-world and did not survive long. The biology is more normal than Mieville. Brands’ nonfiction Whole Earth has symmetrical biotech, urbanization and climate though it is more optimistic. A setting in America may have had less mysticism, or in India more divergence of best and worst conditions. The earth does not turn into Mars or Venus here, but it does not seem able to return to any recognized conservationist stage either.

The Annotated Turing: A Guided Tour Through Alan Turing’s Historic Paper On Computability and the Turing Machine, Charles Petzold, 2008. Discusses what can happen when a mathematician attempts to design hardware, actually a mechanical process of proof, yielding a universal virtual machine using notions of finite state and storage, and beginning the field of computer science. This is a tour through mathematical history and a demonstration of how thoughts can be clarified, though details of the existential origins in time of national crisis may be hidden. The subject, one of the most often-cited papers of the century, e.g. impressing Claude Shannon during a meeting prior to his publication about information theory, had ideas which non-mathematicians also sought to understand for potential uses, and which continue to inspire approaches to logical problem-solving. The book author’s style is conversational as if second person directly to the reader. The contents of the original are presented intact with background, biography and blanks filled in enough to translate it to English for the casual reader. There is an extensive bibliography around the scientist and topic.

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Cloud Aided Design

Posted by cadsmith on December 30, 2009

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Happy 2010! As the new year begins, a decent realization is that the cell phone has become the point mass for a lot of activities. Surfing is mobile, possibly until it hits a google wave. We have weathered web2.0 and skyrocketing social networks. Our memories in words and videos are uploaded to social media. The device is a workspace and dashboard. It is also a purchasing portal that can read a credit card or act as one, or broker bartering. It may try the sanity of the state which is working out its own glitches and gotchas concerning validation and authentication previously handled by mail, phone or visit. Expect other levels of management and administration to soon follow which may lead to better data visibility and accountability extending not only to the future, but also to the revealed past. What do we know and when will we know it? Reality now includes augmentation, automation and games. The scale of participants is passing another tipping point. If one can’t already detect observers from the data, can change something arbitrarily and listen for who screams. Or we learn to rapidly reorganize without models when perspective is the point. Enterprises are about to morph from email entanglement to semantic manufacturing. It is expected that ecommerce will get a boost from the cloud matrix and stimulate startups.

A lot of things are still unrealized for many including feedback, proxy, answers, alerts, avatars, agents, resources, reinforcements, data sources, or sensors. Might be nice to get fees or a retainer for appliance-based ads or commissions for pro portals. It becomes a challenge as to how to get expertise when lacking the internet. Economic caution is warranted to avoid indentured servitude where rental replaces any ownership, and leaders are summarily sentenced for large-scale liabilities. If science funding has to revert to some form of crowdsource, marketing is a competitor of education. Perhaps there will be realtime translation of technical terminology or automatically generated news video tabloids. What are the requirements, opportunities, spending, competition, standards and best fit? Save that scheme or algorithm for implementation as a service or filter since somebody will probably need it.

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