Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Posts Tagged ‘aviation’

In Media Res

Posted by cadsmith on February 14, 2011

Pen.io publishes pages. SpeakerText does transcription. TigerText does secure texting. Mobile Basecamp released. Automated reading clarifies historic maps. Cloud contest announced. HP challenges Google for cloud. Paygr does service classifieds. DIY blogs Ramshackle Solid and Homegrown Evolution feature case studies.

Universal flu vaccine handles all strains. DNA adhesives used to label valuables.

Anonymous claims Stuxnet source. Night Dragon virus penetrates energy firm systems. Medical Device Innovation Initiative fast tracks regulatory approvals. Unmanned combat air system US Navy X-47B tested.

Motorika provides robotic rehab. Affetto does realistic faces. Bilibot Project makes robotics cheaper. eRockit and YikeBike offer electric bikes.

Nanowires do computing. On-chip photonics speed up processing. There were twenty-five recent links.

Book review:

Verification and Validation in Scientific Computing, Oberkampf and Roy, 2010

Scientific computing is finding more uses in engineering and research. This book is about model verification. The questions are how well a simulation matches an actual activity, or how to get experimental data for a mathematics of micro- and nano-scales, and whether reviewers will find the results credible. Verification activities are shown for software, solution, model and management. Predictive capability is summarized in several steps for identifying sources of uncertainty, characterizing them, estimating error and uncertainty in the system response quantities (SRQs), updating the model, and analyzing sensitivities. There are five parts for sixteen chapters, and an appendix.

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New Year’s Greetings

Posted by cadsmith on December 26, 2010

Mechanical Turk provides pool of internet beta testers. Mass High Tech has feed on startups. Google converts wave to shared spaces. Electronic authentication built into banknotes. Smart grid gets smarter. Hydrogen and oxygen produced using solar energy. Bruce Sterling discusses Wikileaks. Surveillance on police. New Year’s security trends. Software requests made by sysadmins. EditPad has online text editor. Delicious does semantic analysis. Groupon trains journalists. Local gifts shown on eBay. Wall St. computers trade on news. Numenta AI apps discussed. Pen provides biofeedback. Developer makes prosthetic tentacle. Gostai Jazz telebot. Eclipse Phase has posthuman game. New ScienceFiction.com site. New Zealand put UFO data online. The Last of the Humans 2010 second edition technothriller about the rise and fall of machine-controlled civilization on Earth was revised and expanded to eight chapters on Amazon and Scribd. Twenty-three links added. (Photo: Boeing X-45 )

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Good Idea

Posted by cadsmith on November 14, 2010

The internet remains a magnet for progress as it offers automated sports analysis, contextual intelligence, faster 32nm processor, datamining source code, a database of things, a social browser, social books, and a spaceship sim. Robotics is used as a home guard and actress. Sustainability makes a grand challenge. Comp sci invites philosophy. There are A/R glasses, hybrid Eurocopter, and floating city.

Book review:

Where Good Ideas Come From: the Natural History of Innovation, Steven Johnson, 2010

Good ideas are likely those that connect to eachother. Upon investigation of many events, myths had to be debunked. The author defines seven patterns of innovation and how they relate, including the Adjacent Possible, Liquid Networks, The Slow Hunch, Serendipity, Error, Exaptation, Platforms. A four quadrant diagram is used to classify breakthroughs as market, non-market, individual, or network. An appendix lists the major innovations of the previous six centuries.

Recent links (of about twenty-four):

video

FORA.tv – Steven Johnson: Where Good Ideas Come From

YouTube – Authors@Google: John C. Médaille

YouTube – The Neuropsychology of Self Control – and its Implications for AI [UKH+] (1/8)

YouTube – Eric Berlow: How complexity leads to simplicity

YouTube – Authors@Google: Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers on Collaborative Consumption

YouTube – Taking movies beyond Avatar – for under £100

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Pathos Least

Posted by cadsmith on October 31, 2010

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The internet adds Everest and loses Tehran as US boosts broadband. WiFi direct protocol groups devices. Cell doubles as remote. Semantic web publishes R2RML and MathML 3. China boasts supercomputer lead. Computers used for emotion meter. Intel has press site. HealthTap individualizes care. Knight funds media contest. Security weaves code and judges cyberwar while Iranian hackers trade botnets. No math word problems, but some tips on stories versus statistics. Google does spreadsheet visualization and random street view. AutoBot links car to web. Traffic lights save gas. Digital museums open to public and print 3D. Nook adds color reader. NASA introduces A-Train and tests flight deck. Robots plug into brain and use beanbag hands.

Book reviews:

User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn, 2004

This approach is from Agile User-Centered Design. Stories can also be added to Scrum. Extreme programming, XP, centers on testing, automated and acceptance. The testing is for usability, performance and stress rather than code coverage. There are various techniques used for developing the stories. They are modular for estimation and testability. A case is shown for a workshop having user role cards and story cards. A story card is a reminder of features to discuss. Each bug report is considered its own story. The planning game customer prioritizes their user story cards for the next iteration after developers have indicated the effort estimations for each. Tests are prepared prior to the code. Stories are grouped. A paper prototype is created and refined before programming begins. The UI is postponed for as long as possible. User goals can be listed from which stories will be derived. Burndown charts are used to track iteration hours. Another measure of momentum is the number of story points over time where each is an estimate for an ideal workday. The term smells is used for problems between participants, e.g. customer won’t do the stories, for which solutions are proposed. There are four parts beside an appendix on extreme programming. Each has a chapter summary, responsibilities of the developer and customer, and questions.

Previous links (of about thirty-four):

video

The Poetry of Science: Richard Dawkins and Neil deGrasse Tyson – K21st Essential 21st Century Knowledge
YouTube – R.A. Mashelkar: Breakthrough designs for ultra-low-cost products
The Future of Money on Vimeo
Digg – Deadly Memory Card Testing: Overkill Edition [Video]

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