Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Being Wells

Posted by cadsmith on November 28, 2010

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The internet-of-things will use a mobile embedded SIM chip. Notebook apps include Simplenote, Org-Mode and alternatives. Aviary added an HTML5 Photo Editor. Formstack eases editing. Mastermind allows hands-free game play. Search considers serendipity. Feds aim for cloud option. Trusted Secure Computing is presented in Europe. API usage is clarified. Kaggle aggregates datamining competitors. Data Compression is based on a card trick.

The health industry expects more networks, bots, ad artifacts. Biotech reviews ramifications of ID implants. A mobile camera drone has bird’s eye view. Bots rescue the battle-ridden. Communities reevaluate economics. Futurist Bill Gates discusses progress. Nanoparticles have environmental impact. Journalism uses more social media.  Philosophy uses field experiments. AI attends to when computers will take over and Numenta hierarchical temporal memory. Human Enhancement: Bioliberation shown on video.

There were about twenty-eight recent links.

Book Reviews:

Data Analysis with Open Source Tools, Philipp K. Janert, 2010
This book discusses how to make models and mine data. The author provides caveats that that appearances often override data, decision makers use data for support rather than reasoning, ethics outweigh data, and many things cannot be measured yet. Realtime means right this minute rather than up to date. Data is cleaned prior to analysis. There are a couple of dozen software tools discussed. It uses math examples rather than code, for data analysis and calculus, and has a statistics refresher. There are interesting styles of plots. Some case studies are detailed. Each chapter has workshop exercises, an intermezzo for related topics, and further reading. There are four parts, eighteen chapters and three appendices. The reader interested in data filtering might need additional sources beyond the time series presented here.

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values, Sam Harris, 2010
This book proposes that science can address moral absolutes. If right and good relate to human and animal wll-being, then there are answers. The title is an analogy to a texture that has peaks for well-being and depths for suffering. Mental experience and values can be measured. Facts of the world can be assembled into knowledge. There can then be rational argument that results in the highest amount of well-being. This is an interesting discussion also presented in video lectures. There are five chapters which also include belief, religion and the future of happiness. There is heavy emphasis on topics related to brain science and structures and neuroimaging. The author likens the method to medicine or economics yet, while these are considered sciences, they are subject to significant errors, so there is also a need to understand how to improve the practice of the principles. The reader may also wonder if the brain will be the best processor for these types of decisions. The Monty Hall problem is discussed as a demonstration of the wisdom of switching, but this seems to be neutralized if contestants are split half on one side and half on the other so both would be better off switching.

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