Test Information Space

Journal of Tech, Testing and Trends

Archive for November, 2010

Being Wells

Posted by cadsmith on November 28, 2010

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The internet-of-things will use a mobile embedded SIM chip. Notebook apps include Simplenote, Org-Mode and alternatives. Aviary added an HTML5 Photo Editor. Formstack eases editing. Mastermind allows hands-free game play. Search considers serendipity. Feds aim for cloud option. Trusted Secure Computing is presented in Europe. API usage is clarified. Kaggle aggregates datamining competitors. Data Compression is based on a card trick.

The health industry expects more networks, bots, ad artifacts. Biotech reviews ramifications of ID implants. A mobile camera drone has bird’s eye view. Bots rescue the battle-ridden. Communities reevaluate economics. Futurist Bill Gates discusses progress. Nanoparticles have environmental impact. Journalism uses more social media.  Philosophy uses field experiments. AI attends to when computers will take over and Numenta hierarchical temporal memory. Human Enhancement: Bioliberation shown on video.

There were about twenty-eight recent links.

Book Reviews:

Data Analysis with Open Source Tools, Philipp K. Janert, 2010
This book discusses how to make models and mine data. The author provides caveats that that appearances often override data, decision makers use data for support rather than reasoning, ethics outweigh data, and many things cannot be measured yet. Realtime means right this minute rather than up to date. Data is cleaned prior to analysis. There are a couple of dozen software tools discussed. It uses math examples rather than code, for data analysis and calculus, and has a statistics refresher. There are interesting styles of plots. Some case studies are detailed. Each chapter has workshop exercises, an intermezzo for related topics, and further reading. There are four parts, eighteen chapters and three appendices. The reader interested in data filtering might need additional sources beyond the time series presented here.

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values, Sam Harris, 2010
This book proposes that science can address moral absolutes. If right and good relate to human and animal wll-being, then there are answers. The title is an analogy to a texture that has peaks for well-being and depths for suffering. Mental experience and values can be measured. Facts of the world can be assembled into knowledge. There can then be rational argument that results in the highest amount of well-being. This is an interesting discussion also presented in video lectures. There are five chapters which also include belief, religion and the future of happiness. There is heavy emphasis on topics related to brain science and structures and neuroimaging. The author likens the method to medicine or economics yet, while these are considered sciences, they are subject to significant errors, so there is also a need to understand how to improve the practice of the principles. The reader may also wonder if the brain will be the best processor for these types of decisions. The Monty Hall problem is discussed as a demonstration of the wisdom of switching, but this seems to be neutralized if contestants are split half on one side and half on the other so both would be better off switching.

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Endgame

Posted by cadsmith on November 21, 2010

Approaching the conclusion of the year, predictions for the next begin with announcements for the cloud and security. An easier messaging system is introduced for Facebook and AI may eventually use data. Gravity graphs interests. Ipad may have a new digital newspaper. A personal network supports photography. Indeed searches business classifies. States publish statistics. Developers can use head or gestural interfaces. Augmented reality is used to compose music. Robots learn by doing. Radio uses saltwater antenna. Stuxnet may have been built to change nuclear processing. Drones can survey Mars. Fins offered as prosthetics. A teacher plans to put a camera inside back of head. Climate is answerable to science. Carbon nanotubes are inflammable. Maxwell’s demon has been demonstrated. There are contests for movies, and med and bio images.

Recent links (from about twenty-eight):

This Video Will Blow Your Mind (Probably) | The Creators Project
YouTube – Authors@Google: Kevin Kelly
YouTube – Digital Art@Google: DJ Spooky

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Good Idea

Posted by cadsmith on November 14, 2010

The internet remains a magnet for progress as it offers automated sports analysis, contextual intelligence, faster 32nm processor, datamining source code, a database of things, a social browser, social books, and a spaceship sim. Robotics is used as a home guard and actress. Sustainability makes a grand challenge. Comp sci invites philosophy. There are A/R glasses, hybrid Eurocopter, and floating city.

Book review:

Where Good Ideas Come From: the Natural History of Innovation, Steven Johnson, 2010

Good ideas are likely those that connect to eachother. Upon investigation of many events, myths had to be debunked. The author defines seven patterns of innovation and how they relate, including the Adjacent Possible, Liquid Networks, The Slow Hunch, Serendipity, Error, Exaptation, Platforms. A four quadrant diagram is used to classify breakthroughs as market, non-market, individual, or network. An appendix lists the major innovations of the previous six centuries.

Recent links (of about twenty-four):

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FORA.tv – Steven Johnson: Where Good Ideas Come From

YouTube – Authors@Google: John C. Médaille

YouTube – The Neuropsychology of Self Control – and its Implications for AI [UKH+] (1/8)

YouTube – Eric Berlow: How complexity leads to simplicity

YouTube – Authors@Google: Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers on Collaborative Consumption

YouTube – Taking movies beyond Avatar – for under £100

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To Be Is To Question

Posted by cadsmith on November 7, 2010

IBM personalizes internet. Australia has a digital city. Adobe adds cloud filesharing. Verify gets user feedback on screens. Impure visualizes data. A biological brain navigates a vehicle. In electric cars, a Chevy gets an IP address, and an Urbee is made on printer. Also in 3D, Janus does interactive scanning and holograms do displays. Invisible material disappears. Chip PC is in the plug. Blekko searches selected sites. Gdb does profiling. Sensors warn of landslides. Technoscience combines science and engineering.

Book reviews:

What Technology Wants, Kevin Kelly, 2010
The author seeks the essence of technology as a force the equal of nature. Technology has features such as evolution, complexity, specificity, diversity, and energy dependencies. He introduces the term technium as a form of civilization, an emergent system of accelerated life. Many advancements happen simultaneously in multiple places, e.g. the Axial Age. This is the result of new technologies increasing the odds of successors. There are four parts for fourteen chapters. It is written in an optimistic, mind-expanding style. He covers the ideas of many other authors such as Joel Garreau and W. Brian Arthur. There are twenty-books in the reading list including authors such as Ray Kurzweil and Steward Brand. Though not cited here, there have been efforts to formalize technology’s philosophical roots, theory, and predictions, reviewed earlier on this blog and google books.

Recent links (of about twenty-four):

video

YouTube – Tom Chatfield: 7 ways video games engage the brain
YouTube – Authors@Google: Alice Walker

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